NEH logo
[Return to Query]

Products for grant RA-247969-16

RA-247969-16
Long-term Residential Fellowships Program at the Folger Shakespeare Library
Amanda Herbert, Folger Shakespeare Library

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-247969-16

Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature (Blog Post)
Title: Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature
Author: Nigel Smith
Abstract: The international role of Dutch literature in Britain is little-known outside the Netherlands (and even there not much) since, quite simply, Dutch is not widely known. This book also aims to change that omission addressing the significance of Dutch literature at the time of the Dutch republic’s global zenith. In this period there was also belief in the possibility of a European canon of letters through translation from one vernacular into many languages, and where Latin might still bear sway as a lingua franca.
Date: 2/16/2018
Primary URL: http://collation.folger.edu/2018/02/polyglot-poetics/
Primary URL Description: The Collation
Blog Title: Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature
Website: The Collation

Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature, part II (Blog Post)
Title: Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature, part II
Author: Nigel Smith
Abstract: My concern is to show that early modern vernacular literatures depend on each other as well as on ancient literature. The true picture of early modern European literary activity is a large network with people and texts passing through the north-west territories: the crucible of the Low Countries and northern France. Within this framework, we can observe the beginning of the serious appreciation of English literature and drama in 17th century Europe.
Date: 5/24/18
Primary URL: http://collation.folger.edu/2018/05/polyglot-poetics-part-ii/
Primary URL Description: The Collation
Blog Title: Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature, part II
Website: The Collation

Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666) (Book Section)
Title: Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666)
Author: Nigel Smith
Editor: W.R. Owens
Editor: Michael Davies
Abstract: This chapter looks closely at John Bunyan’s first major narrative, his conversion account Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners (1666), exploring interwoven qualities of intense religious confession, especially the deep sense of sinful guilt; metaphorical vitality drawn from Bunyan’s local experience in Bedfordshire; animated, personified, medicinal citation of the Bible (and other pious books); modes of social abjection; and pursuit of the authority to speak. Grace Abounding was composed when Bunyan was in prison under the terms of the 1664 Conventicle Act, and hence he was using the conversion narrative as a kind of published sermon. Later revisions reduced or erased traces of his earlier religious radicalism, and demonstrated his growing competence as minister and writer, but sometimes compromised authentically remembered spontaneous experience
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199581306.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199581306
Primary URL Description: Link to book online.
Access Model: Subscription
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Book Title: The Oxford Handbook of Paul Bunyan
ISBN: 9780199581306

The European Marvell (Book Section)
Title: The European Marvell
Author: Nigel Smith
Editor: Matthew C. Augustine
Editor: Christoper D'Addario
Abstract: One way forward with English literature in the period is to understand its relationship with the other vernacular literatures of western and central Europe and the colonies of the polities. Many English poets were aware of the politics and sociology of the continental poets, the contexts in which they wrote. Most of the poetry written by Andrew Marvell about the sea is his poetry about the Anglo-Dutch Wars, the three somewhat religious but mostly political and mercantile conflicts of 1651-54, 1664-67, and 1672-74. Not only is Marvell to be considered as a kind of poet in an international context, also his public poetry is part of an international and sometimes highly contested literary arena. To dignify vernacular English by imitating the best examples in antiquity and in Renaissance Italy was no longer the preoccupation for Marvell's generation, or a poet like Marvell, however much it remained a potent force.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526113894/
Primary URL Description: Link to publisher's website.
Access Model: Subscription
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Book Title: Texts and readers in the Age of Marvell
ISBN: 978-1-5261-138

Fulke Greville, Lord Brooke as Interregnum and Restoration Author (Book Section)
Title: Fulke Greville, Lord Brooke as Interregnum and Restoration Author
Author: Nigel Smith
Editor: Russ Leo
Editor: Freya Sierhuis
Abstract: This chapter explores the significance of the appearance of Greville’s Life of Sidney in 1651 and his Remains, the poetic treatises on monarchy and religion in 1670. The Life of Sidney appeared as in favour of mixed monarchy held up by a virtuous aristocracy against the tyranny of the interregnum government, while the Remains offers virtuous, consultative monarchy, fully invested in ‘popularity’, against tyranny and in full favour of toleration. This complex picture stands against the dark machinations of the Cabal government in 1670, in which Charles II played off his Privy Council advisers one against another. Greville’s poems are a very Protestant poetic attack upon various kinds of idolatry, so that they line up well with the iconoclasm of Milton’s Paradise Lost, which had recently appeared, and not at all well with the indubitably royalist, conformist identity of their publisher.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/fulke-greville-and-the-culture-of-the-english-renaissance
Primary URL Description: Publisher's website.
Access Model: subscription
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Book Title: Fulke Greville and the Culture of the English Renaissance
ISBN: 9780198823445

Whig Wit: Andrew Marvell and the Earls of Shaftesbury (Book Section)
Title: Whig Wit: Andrew Marvell and the Earls of Shaftesbury
Author: Nigel Smith
Editor: Patrick Mueller
Abstract: This essay begins recalling its original moment and place of delivery as a conference paper at St Giles’s House, seat of the Earls of Shaftesbury, begun in March 1650 by Sir Anthony Ashley-Cooper, later Baron Ashley and first Earl of Shaftesbury.1 In it, I make some points of connection on the levels of political thought, religious identity, aesthetic philosophy, poetry, and material culture between the careers and writings of the first and third Earls of Shaftesbury, and what by 1700 had become known as a Whig literature, where the poetry and prose of Andrew Marvell played a key role. Marvell’s poetry, as opposed to his prose, may be seen as a link between the career and interests of the first Earl and the aesthetic ideas of the third.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://www.peterlang.com/view/title/19041?format=EPDF
Primary URL Description: Publisher website.
Access Model: Subscription
Publisher: Peter Lang
Book Title: Shaping Enlightenment Politics: The Social and Political Impact of the First and Third Earls of Shaftesbury
ISBN: 978-3-653-0653

Cross-Channel Cavaliers (Article)
Title: Cross-Channel Cavaliers
Author: Nigel Smith
Abstract: Cavalier poetry has often been regarded as quintessentially English: a product of the Caroline court, a fervent aspect of Civil War royalism and a very English version of amorous classicism. This article argues a contrary case: that in significant ways Cavalier verse was indebted to continental poetry in one or other of the European vernacular languages, defined by continental culture and recognized by contemporaries for these qualities. I explore poetry writing in relation to the activities of Cavalier poets in Europe before, during and after the British Civil Wars, either as diplomats, other kinds of political agent, soldiers, tutors, exiles, merchants or just as simple travellers. European poets also came to England, and, while firmly preoccupied in their own business, also directly confronted English matters and people, and wrote poetry about their experiences that may be seen as an integral part of English courtly, literary and royalist identity. I draw on two French examples and one Dutch example, all kinds of libertine verse. English Cavalier verse was strongly, distinctly and enduringly marked by this international literary and experiential encounter, and in some continental poetry we have a new category of Cavalier verse to acknowledge and explore.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/citedby/10.1080/0268117X.2017.1397434?scroll=top&needAccess=true
Primary URL Description: Publisher's website.
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: New Modelled Cavaliers
Publisher: Taylor and Francis Online

Transvernacular Poetry and Government: Andrew Marvell in Early Modern Europe (Article)
Title: Transvernacular Poetry and Government: Andrew Marvell in Early Modern Europe
Author: Nigel Smith
Abstract: Marvell’s experiences as traveling tutor, diplomat and political agent add a dimension of real international encounter in his poetry and prose that stands in addition to the literary citation or quotation of non-English books, and makes his verse distinctive among his contemporaries. This essay maps some of the literary landscape and the politics of literature in the places he visited in Europe, Russia and Scandinavia, and not least the monarchical absolutism experienced by some writers in these places. While some of this encounter and literary knowledge is reflected in his writing, other parts are not. The dominant pattern is that the north European encounter is in general not met by northern literary influence in Marvell’s writing: features of citation, quotation, allusion and echo are largely to southern European sources: mostly French and Italian, but also Spanish. Marvell’s interest in the longer history of lyric is set in the context of the Thirty Years War that seriously inhibited access to valuable ancient manuscripts. The question of the possible influence of some of Marvell’s writings, especially his poetry, in seventeenth-century Europe is discussed. It is to be hoped that the geography of poetry begun here will help illuminate the European dimensions of Marvell’s writings as more concrete details of his activities and his writings in Europe as well as in England are discovered.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: https://marvell.openlibhums.org/articles/10.16995/ms.14/
Primary URL Description: Publisher Website
Access Model: subscription
Format: Journal
Publisher: Marvell Studies

Legal Agency as Literature in the English Revolution: The Case of the Levellers (Article)
Title: Legal Agency as Literature in the English Revolution: The Case of the Levellers
Author: Nigel Smith
Abstract: The literary canon of the mid-seventeenth century has always included works of argument in various spheres—religious, political, philosophical, and juridical—that make up the polemic of the civil wars and the experiment with non-monarchical government that followed. This very large body of usually printed literature was often in the form of a legal plea. One area in which law was reconceived in the name of the common people and exemplified in public and courtroom protest, on the printed page and in the internal politics of the New Model Army, was the Leveller movement, most famously exemplified in the career and expression of John Lilburne. The broader impact of Leveller revisions to legal understanding is exemplified in the activities of the 1650s popular republican and Restoration law publisher John Streater.
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199660889.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199660889-e-45
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Other
Periodical Title: The Oxford Handbook of English Law and Literature, 1500-1700
Publisher: Oxford University Press

An Information State for Early Modern England (Article)
Title: An Information State for Early Modern England
Author: Nick Popper
Abstract: This article represents an experiment in examining the political world of early modern England. It argues that small, contingent shifts in the practices of acquiring and communicating political knowledge reshaped the information resources of the English regime, reconfiguring its modes of operation and reverberating into structural transformation. What emerged from this alteration was a political form only recently thematized by historians: the information state, or a government that prioritized the collecting, interpreting, manipulating, and disseminating of information as a primary mode of exercising and maintaining power.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/698925
Primary URL Description: Journal Website
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal of Modern History
Publisher: Journal of Modern History

Review of Noah Dauber, State and Commonwealth: The Theory of the State in Early Modern England, 1549-1640 (Article)
Title: Review of Noah Dauber, State and Commonwealth: The Theory of the State in Early Modern England, 1549-1640
Author: Nick Popper
Abstract: What connective tissue bound government and its subjects in early modern England? For decades, historians of political thought have emphasized how the principle of sovereignty emerged supreme from an array of competing logics for authority and obedience. For them, the story of early modern politics is one of gradual alignment—often through the pressure of debate and disagreement—under the ideology of the sovereign state. Concurrently, social historians have demonstrated that, far from reflecting rigid hierarchies, early modern authority was always negotiated, produced by collaborations and complicities, and that the improbable stability of early modern England depended on tacit acceptance of an army of officials performing essential tasks and arbitrating local disputes. These two scholarly communities have remained discrete, and the theoretical underpinning for the mediating stratum of governance has remained largely unexamined except for its occasional, if influential, characterization as evidence of inchoate republicanism. Noah Dauber’s exceptional State and Commonwealth both illuminates this gap and brilliantly fills it.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/renaissance-quarterly/article/state-and-commonwealth-the-theory-of-the-state-in-early-modern-england-15491640-noah-dauber-princeton-princeton-university-press-2016-xiv-264-pp-27/48FBF9026AC50AF71A4CE5767F21C0BD
Primary URL Description: Link to article
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Renaissance Quarterly
Publisher: Renaissance Quarterly

Review of Alexandre Tessier, Reseaux Diplomatiques et Republiques des Lettres: Les correspondants de Dir Joseph Williamson (1660-1680) (Article)
Title: Review of Alexandre Tessier, Reseaux Diplomatiques et Republiques des Lettres: Les correspondants de Dir Joseph Williamson (1660-1680)
Author: Nick Popper
Abstract: The seventeenth century has long been characterized as an age of erudite diplomats whose negotiations were lubricated by mutual admiration borne of shared devotion to enterprises like natural philosophy and numismatics.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://brill.com/abstract/journals/erl/3/1/article-p102_102.xml
Primary URL Description: Link to article
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Erudition and the Republic of Letters
Publisher: Erudition and the Republic of Letters

“Restrictions and Returns: Early Modern English Women’s Travel and Travel Writing.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Restrictions and Returns: Early Modern English Women’s Travel and Travel Writing.”
Author: Patricia Akhimie
Abstract: This work will entail an examination of Folger sources including manuscript travel diaries and letters, such as Henry Belasyse’s “A voyage or journey from London into France” (Folger G.a.5), as well as rare examples of expense reports, travel licenses, and passports like the one signed by Elizabeth I for Thomas Knevet of Norfolk (Folger Z.c.24 (23)), and ars apodemica (art of travel) treatises such as Sir Thomas Palmer’s 1606 treatise, An essay of the meanes hovv to make our trauailes (Folger STC 19156). These sources will help to paint a broad and informative picture of travel for both men and women in the period, and to situate women’s travel in relation to a larger discourse of travel in the early modern period, a discourse in which women’s travel was not often deemed necessary or even desirable.
Date: 5/10/19

Pounced Corrections in Oxford copies of Cavendish's Philosophical and Physical Opinions; or, Margaret Cavendish (Article)
Title: Pounced Corrections in Oxford copies of Cavendish's Philosophical and Physical Opinions; or, Margaret Cavendish
Author: Liza Blake
Abstract: The prose in Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle’s Philosophical and Physical Opinions (1663) literally glitters. Or at least, it does in most of the copies of the book to be found in Oxford college libraries. Bits of blotting sand or ground magnesium mica, sticking to inked corrections in the book, sparkle and create flashes of light when seen from different angles. This essay is about those sparkly bits—variously called stanchgrain, pounce, pin-dust, sand, blotting sand, callis sand, or Calais sand—and what their appearance in copies across Oxford libraries tells us about Cavendish’s revisions to the third edition of her natural philosophical treatise.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: http://https://www.new.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/2018-12/10NCN6%20%282018%29%20Blake%20on%20Pouncing_0.pdf
Primary URL Description: Link to article
Access Model: Open source
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: New College Notes
Publisher: New College Notes

"What is an Aesopian Fable? The Case of the Renaissance Catwoman" (Blog Post)
Title: "What is an Aesopian Fable? The Case of the Renaissance Catwoman"
Author: Liza Blake
Abstract: What is an Aesopian fable in the Renaissance? This post is about where our modern Aesopian fables come from, drawing on the Folger Shakespeare Library’s incredibly rich collections of animal fables. For more detail and proper notes, I recommend the recently published volume Arthur Golding’s A Moral Fabletalk and Other Renaissance Fable Translations, which I co-edited with Kathryn Vomero Santos—a copy of which is also held at the Folger.1
Date: 11/8/2018
Primary URL: https://collation.folger.edu/2018/11/aesopian-fable-catwoman/
Primary URL Description: Link to blog post
Blog Title: "What is an Aesopian Fable? The Case of the Renaissance Catwoman"
Website: www.collation.folger.edu

"Locating Margaret Cavendish's Books: Database, Map, and Analysis" (Blog Post)
Title: "Locating Margaret Cavendish's Books: Database, Map, and Analysis"
Author: Liza Blake
Abstract: This chart—begun in 2014 by Cameron Kroetsch, and finished in 2018 by myself (Liza Blake) and my RA Alaheh Amini1 —gives all the locations in which copies of Cavendish’s books survive. It is intended, first and foremost, as a resource for researchers, particularly those who might want to conduct bibliographical research on Cavendish’s work, and those who might want to produce scholarly editions. Any scholarly edition begins with a survey of surviving copies; we hope that the labor that went into this chart helps to save the step of locating those copies for future researchers and editors. Below I describe the methodology for putting the chart together, and give a brief sketch of noteworthy findings that came out of the project.
Date: 11/14/2018
Primary URL: http://digitalcavendish.org/original-research/locating-margaret-cavendish/
Primary URL Description: Link to blog post.
Blog Title: "Locating Margaret Cavendish's Books: Database, Map, and Analysis"
Website: Digital Cavendish Project

Arranging Cavendish's Atom Poems: Twine Experiment" (Game/Simulation)
Title: Arranging Cavendish's Atom Poems: Twine Experiment"
Author: Liza Blake
Abstract: Arrangement was a central concept in ancient and early modern atomism, and also to Cavendish’s atomistic poetics: each poem is not a stand-alone, self-complete, well-wrought urn, but a kind of tile that can be rearranged into different mosaics of thought. Cavendish undertakes one such rearrangement in her 1664 edition, where the poems appear in a radically new configuration, and with new lines, ideas, and word-choices. The shuffling of the poems across editions, I argue, is not a correction, but an experiment on Cavendish’s part, an attempt to think through concepts of arrangement, atomism, and the logic of collection. Her experiment changes how we read her poetry, and, in a larger scale, helps us rethink histories of early reading practices as well as poetry’s contributions to atomistic philosophy during the rise of science.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: http://philome.la/medrenliza/arranging-cavendishs-atom-poems-twine-experiment/play
Primary URL Description: link to game
Access Model: Open source
Programming Language/Platform: http://philome.la/medrenliza/arranging-cavendishs-atom-poems-twine-experiment/play
Source Available?: Yes

"Teaching Editing in an Undergraduate Women Writers Class: An Interactive Digital Edition of Margaret Cavendish's Atom Poems" (Blog Post)
Title: "Teaching Editing in an Undergraduate Women Writers Class: An Interactive Digital Edition of Margaret Cavendish's Atom Poems"
Author: Liza Blake
Abstract: This post will describe a three-part “Editing Women Writers” set of scaffolded assignments that I used in my undergraduate course “Early Modern Women Writers” in the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM)’s Spring term of 2018. The class’s evaluation was divided: half of the grades came from more typical academic assignments (a short and long paper, and quizzes), and half came from experiential learning assignments (a Transcribathon, and assignments leading up to a class-wide editing project to produce a student-made anthology of women writers). Below I describe the context for the collaborative anthology as well as the learning outcomes; describe the assignments and how they were deployed; and reflect on the success of the experiment to incorporate editing into the classroom environment. I end with some practical tips on how the assignments might be adapted or generalized for different group sizes, different levels of study, and/or different courses.
Date: 12/19/2018
Primary URL: https://wwp.northeastern.edu/blog/teaching-editing/
Primary URL Description: Link to blog post
Blog Title: "Teaching Editing in an Undergraduate Women Writers Class: An Interactive Digital Edition of Margaret Cavendish's Atom Poems"
Website: Women Writers Project

"The Townshends' Gardens through the Written Sources" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "The Townshends' Gardens through the Written Sources"
Author: Raffaella Giannetto
Abstract: Description of the Townshend Gardens.
Date: 5/24/2019
Conference Name: Fellows Research Colloquia

"The Mapper and the Rambler" (Blog Post)
Title: "The Mapper and the Rambler"
Author: Isaac Stephens
Abstract: Are you a person who makes sure to have all your proverbial ducks in a row, everything meticulously planned out before you engage in a project, make your goals a reality, or depart on a trip? Or rather, are you someone who goes wherever the winds take you, your curiosity and openness to the unexpected prompting you to create things, to reap the rewards of a dream attained, or to traverse the globe? Are you a mapper or a rambler?
Date: 1/22/2019
Primary URL: https://collation.folger.edu/2019/01/the-mapper-and-the-rambler/
Primary URL Description: Link to article.
Blog Title: "The Mapper and the Rambler"
Website: collations.folger.edu

""Much Against the Mind of Some Present': Ejections and Parochial Politics in London" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: ""Much Against the Mind of Some Present': Ejections and Parochial Politics in London"
Author: Isaac Stephens
Abstract: Parochial Politics in London
Date: 4/12/2019
Conference Name: Rethinking Civil War London


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/products.aspx?gn=RA-247969-16