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Products for grant RA-259407-18

RA-259407-18
Long-term Research Fellowships at The American School of Classical Studies at Athens
Jenifer Neils, American School of Classical Studies at Athens

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-259407-18

Bronze Age Europe: Revolutions in Agricultural Adaptation (Book Section)
Title: Bronze Age Europe: Revolutions in Agricultural Adaptation
Author: Lynne A Kvapil
Editor: David B. Hollander
Editor: Tim Howe
Abstract: A Companion to Ancient Agriculture is an authoritative overview of the history and development of agriculture in the ancient world. Focusing primarily on the Near East and Mediterranean regions, this unique text explores the cultivation of the soil and rearing of animals through centuries of human civilization—from the Neolithic beginnings of agriculture to Late Antiquity. Chapters written by the leading scholars in their fields present a multidisciplinary examination of the agricultural methods and influences that have enabled humans to survive and prosper.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.wiley.com/en-us/A+Companion+to+Ancient+Agriculture-p-9781118970928
Primary URL Description: Publisher website
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Book Title: A Companion to Ancient Agriculture
ISBN: 978-1-118-9709

The Birth of the Domestic Goddess: Gendered Farm Labor in Late Bronze Age Greece (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Birth of the Domestic Goddess: Gendered Farm Labor in Late Bronze Age Greece
Author: Lynne A Kvapil
Abstract: The Birth of the Domestic Goddess: Gendered Farm Labor in Late Bronze Age Greece
Date: 02/05/2021
Primary URL: https://www.indianaclassics.org/meetings.html
Primary URL Description: Conference website
Conference Name: Indiana Classical Conference, Indianapolis, IN

Fraction = Union (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Fraction = Union
Abstract: This project investigates how artists used vivid visual allegories of Christ's broken body in the Eucharist as a means to conceptualize and represent ecumenical union: the aspiration to unite Christian peoples worldwide into one, undivided, universal Church. The protagonist of the project is a well-known Byzantine micromosaic icon of Christ the Man of Sorrows, enshrined since ca. 1400 at the Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome. Crafted from nearly 50,000 minute pieces of glass, metal, marble, and stone, the icon is among the most meticulous depictions of the human body in medieval art. The story of this icon, which journeyed from Constantinople to Rome via the Kingdom of Naples and other Mediterranean ports-of-call, affords new insight into the metaphorical meaning of Christ's broken body in both Orthodox and Latin/Catholic ritual contexts at a critical juncture in the political conflict between the divided Churches of East and West. Enshrined in Rome in an extraordinary triptych reliquary cabinet and ensconced by relics representing all corners of medieval Christendom, the icon became the centerpiece to a grand microcosm of the Christian oecumene: “the known world.” Ultimately, the project showcases the roles of art and allegory in creating a new, global vision for the Church at the close of the Middle Ages––a mosaic made up of diverse parts, united in a cohesive, ecclesiological body.
Author: John Lansdowne
Date: 11/01/2020
Location: Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies
Primary URL: http://itatti.harvard.edu/people/john-lansdowne
Primary URL Description: Speaker's profile about work, as posted on institute's website.

Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities (Book)
Title: Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities
Author: Julia Shear
Abstract: In ancient Athens, the Panathenaia was the most important festival and was celebrated in honour of Athena from the middle of the sixth century BC until the end of the fourth century AD. This in-depth study examines how this all-Athenian celebration was an occasion for constructing identities and how it affected those identities. Since not everyone took part in the same way, this differential participation articulated individuals' relationships both to the goddess and to the city so that the festival played an important role in negotiating what it meant to be Athenian (and non-Athenian). Julia Shear applies theories of identity formation which were developed in the social sciences to the ancient Greek material and brings together historical, epigraphical, and archaeological evidence to provide a better understanding both of this important occasion and of Athenian identities over the festival's long history.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/classical-studies/ancient-history/serving-athena-festival-panathenaia-and-construction-athenian-identities?format=HB&isbn=9781108485272
Primary URL Description: publisher website
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9781108485272
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

Polis and Panathenaia in Hellenistic Athens (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Polis and Panathenaia in Hellenistic Athens
Abstract: Discussion with class about the Polis and the festival of the Panathenaia in Hellenistic Athens. For NYU graduate seminar CLASS-GA 3401: What is Hellenistic Religion
Author: Julia Shear
Date: 11/03/2020
Location: New York University

The Panathenaia at Athens (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: The Panathenaia at Athens
Abstract: Discussion about the Panathenaia festival in Athens for Professor Selene Psoma's graduate seminar at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Author: Julia Shear
Date: 04/21/2021
Location: National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Readers, Viewers, and Inscriptions in Athens in 200 B.C. (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Readers, Viewers, and Inscriptions in Athens in 200 B.C.
Author: Julia Shear
Abstract: In the spring of 200 B.C., when the Athenians declared war on Philip V of Macedon, they voted to destroy statues and inscriptions for Philip and his ancestors (Livy 32.44.4-6). This decision also led to the excising of references to the Macedonian kings and their family in inscriptions. In an important essay, Byrne (2010) reconsidered this material, but he focused on the political circumstances surrounding the events; earlier scholars also concentrated on the historical and political ramifications of this episode (e.g. Habicht 1982: 147-150; Flower 2006: 34-40). They did not ask what this material can tell us about how readers and viewers interacted with these texts. As I shall argue, these erasures show clearly that these inscriptions were expected to be read. The erasures also changed the texts and thus the imagery of the individuals involved. While some changes were benign, others dramatically altered how viewers would engage with the text and understand the imagery.
Date: 01/07/2021
Primary URL: https://classicalstudies.org/annual-meeting/152/abstract/readers-viewers-and-inscriptions-athens-200-bc
Primary URL Description: Abstract for conference presentation
Conference Name: AIA/SCS Virtual Annual Meetings

Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memory in Classical Athens (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memory in Classical Athens
Abstract: Lysias, his Funeral Oration, and Collective Memory in Classical Athens. For the Kosmos Society at the Center for Hellenic Studies.  (The Kosmos Society is an online outreach arm of the Center for Hellenic Studies)
Author: Julia Shear
Date: 03/05/2021
Location: Kosmos Society at the Center for Hellenic Studies
Primary URL: https://kosmossociety.chs.harvard.edu/?p=54585
Primary URL Description: posting about lecture

Tectius illa cupit: Female Pleasure in Ovid’s Ars Amatoria (Article)
Title: Tectius illa cupit: Female Pleasure in Ovid’s Ars Amatoria
Author: Erika Weiberg
Abstract: Tectius illa cupit: Female Pleasure in Ovid’s Ars Amatoria
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.ttupress.org/journals/helios/
Primary URL Description: Journal website
Secondary URL: https://www.worldcat.org/title/helios-journal-of-the-classical-association-of-the-southwest/oclc/2464767
Secondary URL Description: worldcat
Access Model: Subscription
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Helios
Publisher: Helios

The Writing on the Mind: Deianeira's Trauma in Sophocles' Trachiniae (Article) [show prizes]
Title: The Writing on the Mind: Deianeira's Trauma in Sophocles' Trachiniae
Author: Erika Weiberg
Abstract: Drawing on modern trauma research and trauma theory, this article argues that Sophocles' Trachiniae dramatizes the psychological wounds of a victim of sexual assault. Through analyses of Deianeira's stories about her past, this article highlights a female perspective on trauma and its disastrous consequences for the victim and her community.
Year: 2020
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/333586852_The_Writing_on_the_Mind_Deianeira's_Trauma_in_Sophocles'_Trachiniae
Primary URL Description: Bibliographical website
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Phoenix
Publisher: Phoenix

The Writing on the Mind Revisited: Deianeira’s Trauma in Sophocles’ Women of Trachis (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: The Writing on the Mind Revisited: Deianeira’s Trauma in Sophocles’ Women of Trachis
Abstract: Almost every Greek tragedy features a wound. Oedipus’ gouged-out eyes are among the most memorable, but there are many other varieties: combat wounds, animal bites, and even emotional wounds. This last type of trauma dominates the events of Sophocles’ Women of Trachis, which dramatizes the connection between Deianeira’s emotional pain and the physical pain of her husband, Heracles. Over the course of the play, Deianeira narrates the chronic pain and anxiety she feels during Heracles’ cyclical absences, as well as a past incident of sexual violence that continues to affect her even many years later. Drawing on modern trauma research, this talk argues that Sophocles’ Women of Trachis depicts the struggle of putting words to these types of emotional wounds.
Author: Erika Weiberg
Date: 12/02/2020
Location: Cologne Mythological Network, University of Cologne
Primary URL: https://komparatistik.uni-koeln.de/en/juniorprofessur-komparatistik/cologne-mythological-network
Primary URL Description: Network's website, with abstract/announcement.

Erika Weiberg, Duke University, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor (Staff/Faculty/Fellow Position)
Name: Erika Weiberg, Duke University, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor
Abstract: Erika Weiberg, Duke University, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://scholars.duke.edu/person/erika.weiberg
Primary URL Description: department website


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