NEH logo
[Return to Query]

Products for Grant RA-50096-10

RA-50096-10
Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions
Margot Nishimura, John Carter Brown Library

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-50096-10

The Forbidden Lands: Colonial Identity, Frontier Violence, and the Persistence of Brazil’s Eastern Indians, 1750-1830 (Book) [show prizes]
Title: The Forbidden Lands: Colonial Identity, Frontier Violence, and the Persistence of Brazil’s Eastern Indians, 1750-1830
Author: Hal Langfur
Abstract: The Forbidden Lands concerns a pivotal but unexamined surge in frontier violence that engulfed the eastern forests of eighteenth-century Brazil's most populous region, Minas Gerais. Focusing on social, cultural, and racial relations, it challenges standard depictions of the occupation of Portuguese America's vast interior, while situating its frontier history in the broader context of the Americas and the Atlantic world. The author argues that the key to understanding the colony's internal consolidation, ignored and misconstrued by scholars fixed on coastal events and export-led development, resides in the incompatible ways in which Luso-Brazilians, Afro-Brazilians, and seminomadic indigenous peoples accused of cannibalism sought to territorialize their distinctive societies. He demonstrates that cultural conflict on the frontier was a defining characteristic of Brazil's transition from colony to independent nation and a fundamental consequence of its relationship to a wider world. The study moves Brazil to a prominent place in our understanding of the hemispheric sweep of internal colonization in the Americas. Essays based on material in this book have won two prizes for scholarly articles: the 2006 CLAH prize and the 2005 Tibesar Prize (From inside flap.)
Abstract: "The Forbidden Lands" concerns a pivotal but unexamined surge in frontier violence that engulfed the eastern forests of eighteenth-century Brazil's most populous region, Minas Gerais. Focusing on social, cultural, and racial relations, it challenges standard depictions of the occupation of Portuguese America's vast interior, while situating its frontier history in the broader context of the Americas and the Atlantic world. The author argues that the key to understanding the colony's internal consolidation - ignored and misconstrued by scholars fixed on coastal events and export-led development - resides in the incompatible ways in which Luso-Brazilians, Afro-Brazilians, and seminomadic indigenous peoples accused of cannibalism sought to territorialize their distinctive societies. He demonstrates that cultural conflict on the frontier was a defining characteristic of Brazil's transition from colony to independent nation and a fundamental consequence of its relationship to a wider world. The study moves Brazil to a prominent place in our understanding of the hemispheric sweep of internal colonization in the Americas.
Year: 2006
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Publisher: Stanford University Press, 2006. Paperback edition, 2009.
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 978-0804751803
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

The Blood of the Dragon: Alchemy and Natural History in Nicolás Monardes's Historia Medicinal (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Blood of the Dragon: Alchemy and Natural History in Nicolás Monardes's Historia Medicinal
Author: Ralph Bauer
Abstract: The paper comes from his book project, “The Alchemy of Conquest: Prophecy, Discovery and the Secrets of the New World.”
Date: 10/04/2013
Primary URL: http://rll.drupalgardens.com/content/ralph-bauer-gives-talk-campus
Primary URL Description: Online announcement of the talk for the SUNY campus.
Conference Name: Early Modern Research Workshop of the Humanities Institute, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Propaganda and Political Legitimacy in Early Eighteenth-Century Mexico (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Propaganda and Political Legitimacy in Early Eighteenth-Century Mexico
Author: Frances L. Ramos
Abstract: In 1711, toward the end of the decade-long War of the Spanish Succession, the cathedral chapter of the archdiocese of Mexico published an impassioned account of its many displays of loyalty on behalf of Philip V. After almost two centuries of Habsburg rule, Philip V and his advisors were under no illusions that Spanish subjects would transfer their loyalty over easily from Carlos II and, for this reason, ordered constant public demonstrations of loyalty throughout the course of the war. Mexico City’s cathedral chapter responded accordingly and opened its account with Psalm 62, verse 12: “But the king shall rejoice in God, all they shall be praised that swear by him: because the mouth is stopped of them that speak wicked things.” Using cathedral chapter and municipal council minutes and a large body of published sermons, this paper focuses on the secular and religious elite of Mexico City’s attempts to stop the utterance of “wicked things” during the War of the Spanish Succession. Loyalty to the Habsburg house would prove hard to combat, as evidenced by several people arrested in Mexico for supposedly rooting for the Austrian Alliance. In order to combat disloyalty, the municipal council, cathedral chapter, and all of the city’s convents organized a variety of public ceremonies in support of the Bourbon house, including masses and festivities honoring the birth of crown prince Louis I, funerary honors for fallen soldiers, and, finally, masses of thanksgiving marking Spain’s imminent victory in 1711. Taken together, these commemorations helped to cast the Bourbon king as Spain’s “savior,” a trope that would continue throughout the eighteenth century and shapes the historiography of the early modern Spanish Empire to this day.
Date: 01/03/2014
Primary URL: https://aha.confex.com/aha/2014/webprogram/Paper14307.html
Primary URL Description: Conference program listing
Conference Name: American Historical Association Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., January 2-5, 2014

Native Diasporas: Indigenous Identities and Settler Colonialism in the Americas (Book)
Title: Native Diasporas: Indigenous Identities and Settler Colonialism in the Americas
Editor: Gregory D. Smithers
Editor: Brooke N. Newman
Abstract: The arrival of European settlers in the Americas disrupted indigenous lifeways, and the effects of colonialism shattered Native communities. Forced migration and human trafficking created a diaspora of cultures, languages, and people. Gregory D. Smithers and Brooke N. Newman have gathered the work of leading scholars, including Bill Anthes, Duane Champagne, Daniel Cobb, Donald Fixico, and Joy Porter, among others, in examining an expansive range of Native peoples and the extent of their influences through reaggregation. These diverse and wide-ranging essays uncover indigenous understandings of self-identification, community, and culture through the speeches, cultural products, intimate relations, and political and legal practices of Native peoples. Native Diasporas explores how indigenous peoples forged a sense of identity and community amid the changes wrought by European colonialism in the Caribbean, the Pacific Islands, and the mainland Americas from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Broad in scope and groundbreaking in the topics it explores, this volume presents fresh insights from scholars devoted to understanding Native American identity in meaningful and methodologically innovative ways.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/861955708
Primary URL Description: Worldcat record
Secondary URL: http://www.nebraskapress.unl.edu/product/Native-Diasporas,675889.aspx
Secondary URL Description: Publisher's web page
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
Type: Edited Volume
ISBN: 978-0-8032-336
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

Language and Conquest: Tupi-Guarani Expansion in the European Colonization of Brazil and Amazonia (Book Section)
Title: Language and Conquest: Tupi-Guarani Expansion in the European Colonization of Brazil and Amazonia
Author: M. Kittiya Lee
Editor: Salikoko S. Mufwene
Abstract: This book is about various linguistic aspects and consequences of the effective colonization of Latin America by Portugal and Spain since the dawn of the 16th century. It is about how Portuguese and Spanish (then known only as Castilian) have both been influenced by their contacts with indigenous and other languages in their Iberian colonies, as well as how the indigenous languages in particular have also been affected by the colonial languages. The book provides novel perspectives onto how the European colonists first communicated with the Natives, onto the role played by the “factors,” missionaries, Mestizos, and Pardos as interpreters, and onto why one should not assume that jargons or pidgins emerged of necessity out of the initial inter-group contacts. Insights are likewise provided about the gradual ways in which Portuguese and Spanish spread, about how some major indigenous languages (such as Quechua and Tupinamba´) at first benefited from the European colonization and from their adoption by missionaries as lingua francas for proselytizing, as well as about why some Native American languages are being threatened only now or don't appear to be (seriously) endangered yet. Throughout the volume, one has to ask who have been the actual agents and/or drivers of the changes that have affected both indigenous and initially exogenous languages, positively or negatively, in Latin America. And what are the relevant ecological factors that have triggered or simply borne on these evolutions? The subject of African substrate influence is also dealt with, alongside that of Italian adstrate influence on Argentine Spanish. (abstract is on complete book)
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.worldcat.org/title/iberian-imperialism-and-language-evolution-in-latin-america/oclc/5692733543&referer=brief_results
Primary URL Description: WorldCat entry
Secondary URL: http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/I/bo17840969.html
Secondary URL Description: Publisher's website
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Book Title: Iberian Imperialism and Language Evolution in Latin America
ISBN: 9780226126173


Permalink: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/products.aspx?gn=RA-50096-10