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Products for grant RA-50099-11

RA-50099-11
Fellowships at the TLL Institute in Munich
Anthony Corbeill, Society for Classical Studies

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-50099-11

TLL articles: nautea, nauticarius, nauticus, notia 1, notia 2, recrudesco, redintegrator, redintegratio, redintegro, reeficio, refacio, reficio, reformido, regina (Book Section)
Title: TLL articles: nautea, nauticarius, nauticus, notia 1, notia 2, recrudesco, redintegrator, redintegratio, redintegro, reeficio, refacio, reficio, reformido, regina
Author: Adam Gitner
Abstract: The task of the institute is to produce the first comprehensive scholarly dictionary of ancient Latin from the earliest times down to AD 600. The work is based on an archive of about 10 million slips which takes account of all surviving texts. In the older texts there is a slip for each occurrence of each word; the later ones are generally covered by a selection of lexicographically relevant examples. Nowadays this material is supplemented, where appropriate, by the use of modern data-banks. The dictionary articles result from a critical inspection and interpretation of this material. They allow the user to follow the development of meaning and usage in each word. Publication is in separate fascicules; more than two thirds of the complete work have appeared in the printed version and also (on the initiative of the publishers) in electronic form.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://www.thesaurus.badw.de/english/index.htm?PHPSESSID=be291c4764a7ecda995afe250457f67b
Primary URL Description: Thesaurus Linguae Latinae website
Access Model: Subscription only
Publisher: De Gruyeter
Book Title: Thesaurus Linguae Latinae

TLL articles: regemo, regenero, regnator, nemorator, nemoricultrix, nemorensis, nemoreus, nemorositas, nemorivagus, nemorosus, nepeta (Book Section)
Title: TLL articles: regemo, regenero, regnator, nemorator, nemoricultrix, nemorensis, nemoreus, nemorositas, nemorivagus, nemorosus, nepeta
Author: Christopher Simon
Abstract: The task of the institute is to produce the first comprehensive scholarly dictionary of ancient Latin from the earliest times down to AD 600. The work is based on an archive of about 10 million slips which takes account of all surviving texts. In the older texts there is a slip for each occurrence of each word; the later ones are generally covered by a selection of lexicographically relevant examples. Nowadays this material is supplemented, where appropriate, by the use of modern data-banks. The dictionary articles result from a critical inspection and interpretation of this material. They allow the user to follow the development of meaning and usage in each word. Publication is in separate fascicules; more than two thirds of the complete work have appeared in the printed version and also (on the initiative of the publishers) in electronic form.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: http://www.thesaurus.badw.de/english/index.htm?PHPSESSID=be291c4764a7ecda995afe250457f67b
Publisher: De Gruyeter
Book Title: Thesaurus Linguae Latinae

Nautea, notia: A nauseating Root in Plautus (Article)
Title: Nautea, notia: A nauseating Root in Plautus
Author: Adam Gitner
Abstract: n/a
Year: 2016
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Glotta: 92.1

Sardismos: A rhetorical term for bilingual or plurilingual interaction (Article)
Title: Sardismos: A rhetorical term for bilingual or plurilingual interaction
Author: Adam Gitner
Abstract: In his poem ‘The Last Hours of Cassiodorus’, Peter Porter has the Christian sage ask: ‘After me, what further barbarisms?’. Yet, Cassiodorus himself accepted, even valorized, at least one form of barbarism that had been rejected by earlier rhetoricians: sardismos (sa?d?sµ??), the mixture of multiple languages in close proximity. In its earliest attestation, Quintilian classified it as a type of solecism (Inst. 8.3.59). By contrast, five centuries later Cassiodorus in his Commentary on the Psalms used the term three times to praise the mixture of Greek, Hebrew and Latin in the Latin Psalter. This reversal, from vice to virtue of speech, illustrates some significant changes in attitudes toward language and multilingualism that developed as Christianity reshaped Roman literary culture. For one, Christian preachers, modelling themselves on the plain style of the Gospels, embraced forms of speech that had been regarded as low and stigmatized. In the words of Augustine (In psalm. 36, Serm. 3.6): ‘better you understand us in our barbarism than to have been deserted in our eloquence’ (melius in barbarismo nostro uos intelligitis, quam in nostra disertudine uos deserti eritis).1 Secondly, Hebrew now entered the linguistic consciousness of the Roman literary elite as one of the three languages of Scripture. Even if in-depth knowledge remained rare, it was worthy of being mentioned alongside Greek and Latin, just as it had appeared with them in the inscription on Jesus’ cross (Luke 23:38, John 19:20). Lastly, linguistic variety itself came to be positively valued since it reflected the diversity of a church coming together out of many peoples. Commenting on the bride's appearance in Psalm 45, both Augustine and Cassiodorus saw the variegated adornment of her robe as a reference to the diversity of Christian languages.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0009838819000028
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Classical Quarterly


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