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Products for Grant RA-50103-11

RA-50103-11
NEH Postdoctoral Residential Fellowships at the Getty Research Institute
Alexa Sekyra, Getty Research Institute

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-50103-11

China in Medieval Indian Imagination: Production of China-Inspired Images in Eastern India and Nepal during the Tenth through the Twelfth Centuries (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: China in Medieval Indian Imagination: Production of China-Inspired Images in Eastern India and Nepal during the Tenth through the Twelfth Centuries
Abstract: Cross-cultural exchange between India and China during the medieval times is often understood through a Buddhist lens; by investigating the impact of Indian Buddhist sources to receiving Chinese communities. In these cultural transactions, instigated by traveling pilgrim-monks and enacted by imperial power players in China, India emerges as a remote, idealized, and perhaps “hollow” center. What seems to be missing in this unidirectional looking is the impact of these cultural communications in India. What were the Indian responses to Chinese Buddhists’ demands and their physical presence? How was China imagined and translated in medieval India? By examining a group of “China”-inspired Indian Buddhist images and iconographies in the larger geo-political context, this paper charts Indian responses to Chinese and Tibetan demands in their artistic outputs and highlights the complex, multidirectional process of “Other-ing” in medieval global cultural exchange.
Author: Jinah Kim
Date: 02/15/2014
Location: College Art Association Annual Conference, Chicago, IL
Primary URL: http://conference.collegeart.org/2014/schedule/sessions
Primary URL Description: This URL links to the roster of sessions, which provides detail about this presentaion made as part of the session on "Global Art History in the Middle Ages: China and Cros-Cultural Exchange, 500-1500.
Secondary URL: http://http://conference.collegeart.org/2014/
Secondary URL Description: This URL links to the College Art Association Annual Conference home page.

Receptacle of the Sacred: Illustrated Manuscripts and the Buddhist Book Cult in South Asia (Book)
Title: Receptacle of the Sacred: Illustrated Manuscripts and the Buddhist Book Cult in South Asia
Author: Jinah Kim
Editor: N/A
Abstract: In considering medieval illustrated Buddhist manuscripts as sacred objects of cultic innovation, Receptacle of the Sacred explores how and why the South Asian Buddhist book-cult has survived for almost two millennia to the present. A book “manuscript” should be understood as a form of sacred space: a temple in microcosm, not only imbued with divine presence but also layered with the memories of many generations of users. Jinah Kim argues that illustrating a manuscript with Buddhist imagery not only empowered it as a three-dimensional sacred object, but also made it a suitable tool for the spiritual transformation of medieval Indian practitioners.
Year: 2013
Primary URL: http://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21133979640001551
Primary URL Description: This URL provides access to the record for this book in the Getty Research Institute, library catalog.
Access Model: Open Access
Publisher: Unicersity of California Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780520273863
Translator: N/A
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Imperial Illusions: Crossing Pictorial Boundaries in the Qing Palaces (Book)
Title: Imperial Illusions: Crossing Pictorial Boundaries in the Qing Palaces
Author: Kristina Kleutghen
Editor: N/A
Abstract: In the Forbidden City and other palaces around Beijing, Emperor Qianlong (r. 1736-1795) surrounded himself with monumental paintings of architecture, gardens, people, and faraway places. The best artists of the imperial painting academy, including a number of European missionary painters, used Western perspectival illusionism to transform walls and ceilings with visually striking images that were also deeply meaningful to Qianlong. These unprecedented works not only offer new insights into late imperial China's most influential emperor, but also reflect one way in which Chinese art integrated and domesticated foreign ideas. In Imperial Illusions, Kristina Kleutghen examines all known surviving examples of the Qing court phenomenon of "scenic illusion paintings" (tongjinghua), which today remain inaccessible inside the Forbidden City.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://primo.getty.edu/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=GRI&afterPDS=true&institution=01GRI&docId=GETTY_ALMA21161146380001551
Primary URL Description: This URL provides access to the record for this book in the Getty Research Institute, library catalog.
Access Model: Open Access
Publisher: University of Washington Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780295994109
Translator: N/A
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Pockmarked Demons, Pot-bellied Goddesses: Images of Sickness and Healing and Trans-Sectarian Development of Medico-Cultic Practices in Pre-Modern South Asia (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Pockmarked Demons, Pot-bellied Goddesses: Images of Sickness and Healing and Trans-Sectarian Development of Medico-Cultic Practices in Pre-Modern South Asia
Abstract: Many gods and goddesses known in the rich pantheon of Indic religious traditions throughout history have their origins at local level practices that reflect worldly needs of devotees. Addressing one of the most pressing human concerns of life and death, a goddess or a god with ability to cure the sick enjoyed immense trans-regional popularity. Yet, a claim for a specialty against a specific disease is surprisingly rare. In this context, Parn?as´abari¯, a Buddhist goddess of healing with a claimed specialty against smallpox, and her association with Hindu smallpox goddess S´i¯tala¯, provide an interesting case to understand the changing landscape of healing and medicine in medieval South Asia not only because their appearance helps us discern the historical rise of smallpox epidemics in India but also because their iconographies points to the incorporation of the ritual practices of tantric and periphery traditions into much wider use. By closely examining the iconographies of these goddesses as represented in surviving images and ritual texts from the ninth through the twelfth centuries, Jinah Kim suggest that the pattern of iconographic appropriation and adaptation seen in the development of instrumental iconography of healing demonstrates how the interactions between local medico-cultic practices and normative religious institutions informed trans-local understanding of an epidemic disease, which in turn must have contributed to the development of medical discourse and spread of healing strategies in pre-modern South Asia.
Author: Jinah Kim
Date: 4/16/2015
Location: Harvard University, Hindu Studies Colloquium
Primary URL: http://sas.fas.harvard.edu/event/hindu-studies-colloquium-jinah-kim
Primary URL Description: Link to the Harvard University, Hindu Studies Colloquium, program and presentation abstracts.

Sacred Space of a Manuscript: Design Strategies and Codicological Features in Medieval Indic Manuscripts (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Sacred Space of a Manuscript: Design Strategies and Codicological Features in Medieval Indic Manuscripts
Abstract: The early history of the art of the book in India owes much to the Buddhist practice of commissioning beautifully crafted books for religious merits. Once the idea of embellishing and illustrating text folios with paintings was introduced at the turn of the first millennium, initially in Buddhist context, makers and patrons of painted manuscripts experimented with various design strategies and codicological features, most of which emphasized a manuscript’s material quality as a three-dimensional, portable sacred object. By the mid-twelfth century, some Buddhist manuscript makers in eastern India and Nepal began to materialize the concept of a manuscript as a temple in a visually engaging manner. Jinah Kim demonstrate that her analogy of a book as a temple was a consciously chosen design strategy and locate this artistic practice in the larger historical context by drawing comparisons with the design strategies of manuscripts of other Indic religious traditions as well as those seen in temple architecture. Kim also take its ramifications beyond the artistic practice and consider it to be the theoretical framework behind the practice of painted manuscript making in medieval India.
Author: Jinah Kim
Date: 2/27/2015
Location: University of Chicago, Divinity School and the Franke Institute for the Humanities
Primary URL: https://divinity.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/imce/conferences/merits/conference%20abstracts.pdf
Primary URL Description: Link to program and presentation abstracts for the conference "Merits of the Book: Buddhist Manuscript Traditions Across Asia."

A Manuscript’s Public Lives: Examples from South Asia (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: A Manuscript’s Public Lives: Examples from South Asia
Abstract: If reading is a private affair, a beautifully crafted, hand written manuscript ensures that experience be the most private experience of all: it is an object of irreproducible aura. Given this exclusivity, a manuscript experience may be placed at the opposite end of experiential spectrum to the experience of a printed book. Yet, in the case of pre-modern South Asia, where a long history of the supremacy of oral transmission of knowledge prevailed, a manuscript experience was often public. A carefully designed and executed manuscript was often made to serve an important ceremonial role as a ritual object conveying the text, which was performed orally and consumed aurally and visually. This paper explores the public lives of a group of palm-leaf manuscripts prepared during the eleventh through the thirteenth centuries in South Asia by engaging a wide-ranging, long dure´e approach.
Author: Jinah Kim
Date: 10/24/2014
Location: Stanford Humanities Center, Stanford University
Primary URL: https://english.stanford.edu/events/making-publics-past-present-future-publication-interdisciplinary-conference
Primary URL Description: Link to the program for the Stanford University, Humanities Center, Interdisciplinary Conference: "Making Publics: The Past, Present & Future of Publication."

Art History's Tangled Legs (Book Section)
Title: Art History's Tangled Legs
Author: Jessica Horton
Editor: David W. Penney
Editor: Kathleen Ash-Milby
Editor: Montclair Art Museum
Editor: Kay WalkingStick
Editor: National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.)
Editor: Dayton Art Institute
Abstract: Book Abstract: "Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist" is the companion catalogue to the exhibition (opened November 2015) at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Kay WalkingStick (b. 1935) is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation and one of the world's most celebrated artists of Native American ancestry. This volume includes essays by leading scholars and historians, arranged chronologically to guide readers through WalkingStick's life journey and rich artistic career, tracing a path of constant invention, innovation, and evolving artistic and personal growth through visually brilliant and evocative works of art.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://www.worldcat.org/title/kay-walkingstick-an-american-artist/oclc/905600254&referer=brief_results#details-allauthors
Primary URL Description: This URL links to the book’s citation in OCLC WorldCat.
Access Model: Open Access
Publisher: Smithsonian Books
Book Title: Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist
ISBN: 1588345106

Ojibwa Tableaux Vivants: George Catlin, Robert Houle, and Transcultural Materialism (Article)
Title: Ojibwa Tableaux Vivants: George Catlin, Robert Houle, and Transcultural Materialism
Author: Jessica Horton
Abstract: This essay reconsiders the legacy of Ojibwa travellers who performed tableaux vivants or ‘living pictures’ alongside George Catlin's Indian Gallery in Paris, 1845–46, many of whom died of smallpox before returning home. Contemporary Saulteaux artist Robert Houle's architectural installation, Paris/Ojibwa, first exhibited at the Canadian Cultural Center in Paris in 2010, features a stage set peopled by paintings of the deceased travellers. Paris/Ojibwa invites us to see how tableaux vivants incorporated an Ojibwa understanding of the potential liveliness of images and objects. When wedded to complex indigenous notions of personhood, tableaux vivants reversed the ambitions of nineteenth-century ethnography: instead of turning living Natives into static images, they reanimated pictures. Inviting audiences to participate in an indigenous view of a shared modernity, Paris/Ojibwa restores sociability to the archive of Ojibwa representations and models transcultural materialism inside Western institutions.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8365.12184/abstract
Primary URL Description: This URL provides a direct link to the article "Ojibwa Tableaux Vivants: George Catlin, Robert Houle, and Transcultural Materialism” by Jessica L. Horton, published in the Journal "Art History."
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Art History, Volume 39, Issue 1, pages 124–151
Publisher: Art History, on behalf of the Association of Art Historians (AAH)

Painted Palm-Leaf Manuscripts and the Art of the Book in Medieval South Asia (Article)
Title: Painted Palm-Leaf Manuscripts and the Art of the Book in Medieval South Asia
Author: Jinah Kim
Abstract: What was the main principle behind the design strategies developed to prepare painted palm-leaf manuscripts in medieval South Asia? How did various Indic religious communities design their manuscripts? By bringing together surviving painted manuscripts of heterogeneous religious traditions as well as contemporaneous sculptural representations and textual sources relating to the ritual practices involving books, this study suggests that a book was conceived and designed as a temple in Indic context. Taking innovative design strategies of twelfth-century Buddhist manuscripts as a starting point, it also demonstrates how a larger, architectural approach can help us better understand the art of the book in India.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/article/614909
Primary URL Description: This URL links to the annual journal “Archives of Asian Art” article abstract and full article.
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Archives of Asian Art, Volume 65, Numbers 1-2, 2015, pp. 57-86
Publisher: University of Hawai'i Press

Mind Pictures and Manuscript Paintings: Examples from Twelfth Century South Asia (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Mind Pictures and Manuscript Paintings: Examples from Twelfth Century South Asia
Abstract: How do we see and share a mental image? In the era of digital imaging and breakthroughs in neuroscience, capturing and sharing a mind’s image is a distinct possibility that once belonged to sci-fi movies. The desire and the needs to externalize, circulate, and control a mental image pushed and shaped the creative solutions seen in Buddhist painted palm-leaf manuscripts of twelfth century South Asia. This lecture demonstrated how the pictorial and manuscriptological strategies we find in painted palm-leaf manuscripts relate to the tantric vision practices, and how they opened up a unique way to share visual knowledge. This lecture was presented as part of the "TT & WF Chao Buddhist Art Lecture Series."
Author: Jinah Kim
Date: 02/25/2016
Location: Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford University
Primary URL: https://hcbss.stanford.edu/events/jinah-kim-mind-pictures-and-manuscript-paintings-examples-twelfth-century-south-asia-0
Primary URL Description: This URL links to the lecture program announcement, which includes a lecture abstract and presenter bio. It was updated to also provide a digital recording of the lecture.

Peepboxes, Society, and Visuality in Early Modern China (Article)
Title: Peepboxes, Society, and Visuality in Early Modern China
Author: Kristina Kleutghen
Abstract: When European peepboxes and their associated perspectival views arrived in China in the seventeenth century, the elite who first encountered them treated these rarities as foreign curiosities. However, this essay shows that by the mid-nineteenth century not only had both the optical device and the art been sinicized into common local products, but the peepbox had also become a form of street entertainment specifically directed toward children and the lower classes. Unexpectedly, the translation of the peepbox and its perspectival views in early modern China, it is argued, therefore speaks as much to internal differences in class and sophistication as to perceived differences between China and the West. (Special Issue: "Objects in Motion in the Early Modern World"; edited by Daniela Bleichmar and Meredith Martin)
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8365.12180/abstract
Primary URL Description: This URL provides a direct link to the article "Peepboxes, Society, and Visuality in Early Modern China" by Kristine Kleutghen, published in the Journal "Art History."
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Art History, Volume 38, Issue 4, pages 762–777
Publisher: Art History, on behalf of the Association of Art Historians (AAH)

Optical Devices, Art, and Visuality in China (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Optical Devices, Art, and Visuality in China
Author: Kristina Kleutghen
Abstract: When European optical devices were first introduced into early modern East Asia, these devices affected not only viewing experiences and ideas about vision, but also the production of art. In contrast to the well-established effects on Japanese art, the effects on Chinese art have barely been explored, in part because the science of optics did not develop significantly in China prior to the mid-nineteenth century. Yet from the seventeenth century onward, Qing domestic production and use of optical devices resulted in significant relationships with art at the imperial, elite, and popular levels. The devices and the viewing experiences that they mediated created varying levels of foreign intervention into Chinese art, vision, and visuality. However, the consistent but diverse methods of Sinification of all these elements and the reliance on domestic products rather than imports offers new insights into how Qing art engaged the West without being limited to either the court or the capital. Through an art-historical case study of several different optical devices and their related works of art that are all linked through one particular type of magnifying lens, this presentation examined how the production and consumption of these new objects and images varied by place, format, audience, and social status.
Date: 04/15/2016
Primary URL: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/vmpea/
Primary URL Description: This URL links to the Workshop program, with presentation abstracts.
Conference Name: Workshop - "Visual and Material Perspectives on East Asia" University of Chicago, IL

Seeing the World Differently: Qing Art and Optical Devices (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Seeing the World Differently: Qing Art and Optical Devices
Author: Kristina Kleutghen
Abstract: Colloquium Abstract: The colloquium theme “Stimulation and Reanimation: Cultural and Artistic Exchanges between Asia and Europe,” examined exchanges and transformations engendered by the interaction between Asian and European art and culture since the sixteenth century, including: Giuseppe Castiglione and related topics; artistic and cultural exchange between China and Europe; and, the artistic and cultural exchange between various regions in Asia and Europe.
Date: 10/29/2015
Primary URL: http://theme.npm.edu.tw/seminar/10410/en/agenda.html
Primary URL Description: This URL links to the Colloquium program schedule.
Conference Name: “Stimulation and Reanimation: Cultural and Artistic Exchanges Between Asia and Europe – A Colloquium in Celebration of the 90th Anniversary of the National Palace Museum”; Location - National Palace Museum, Taipei

Huang Yong Ping and the Power of Zoomorphic Ambiguity (Book Section)
Title: Huang Yong Ping and the Power of Zoomorphic Ambiguity
Author: Kleutghen, Kristina
Editor: Wang, Eugene
Editor: Silbergeld, Jerome
Abstract: China has an age-old zoomorphic tradition. The First Emperor was famously said to have had the heart of a tiger and a wolf. The names of foreign tribes were traditionally written with characters that included animal radicals. In modern times, the communist government frequently referred to Nationalists as “running dogs,” and President Xi Jinping, vowing to quell corruption at all levels, pledged to capture both “the tigers” and “the flies.” illustrated with works ranging from Bronze Age vessels to twentieth-century conceptual pieces, this volume is a wide-ranging look at zoomorphic and anthropomorphic imagery in Chinese art. The book’s chapter contributors are leading scholars in Chinese art history and related fields.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-9713-9780824846763.aspx
Primary URL Description: URL link to publication detail on the publishers webpage.
Access Model: Open Access
Publisher: University of Hawai’i Press
Book Title: The Zoomorphic Imagination in Chinese Art
ISBN: 978-0-8248-46

The Local Exotic: Fabricating Foreign Taste in Qing Court Decorative Arts (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: The Local Exotic: Fabricating Foreign Taste in Qing Court Decorative Arts
Author: Kleutghen, Kristina
Abstract: This presentation was the keynote address for the international colloquium "Artistic Exchanges as Cultural Transfers Between China and Europe in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries," held at the Palais des Beaux-Arts, Lille, France. The colloquium explored Sino-European artistic interactions by looking at some of the ways European and Chinese art and culture were shaped by these artistic exchanges. It investigated the processes of adaptation, transposition, and accommodation at work in these cultural transfers that encompassed various artistic and disciplinary fields such as garden and design history, material culture, drama, cultural history, and the histories of painting and collecting.
Date: 10/20/2016
Primary URL: http://www.ea-aaa.eu/news/2016/09/international-symposium-artistic-exchanges-as-cultural-transfers-between-china-and
Primary URL Description: URL link to the colloquium's online brochure.
Conference Name: Artistic Exchanges as Cultural Transfers Between China and Europe in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

The Terms of Vision in Late Imperial China (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: The Terms of Vision in Late Imperial China
Abstract: This lecture, "The Terms of Vision in Late Imperial China," was presented in October 2016, as part of the "2016-2017 Vanderbilt History Seminar: The History of the Senses and Emotions." The Vanderbilt History Seminar was established in 2008, to serve as a center for historical inquiry at Vanderbilt University. Each year ten to twelve seminars are sponsored on a common, yet broad theme in which important new scholarship and research are being produced.
Author: Kleutghen, Kristina
Date: 10/31/2016
Location: Vanderbilt University, Nashville TN
Primary URL: https://as.vanderbilt.edu/history/vhs/vhs16-17.php
Primary URL Description: URL link to the 2016-2017 Vanderbilt History Seminar: "The History of the Senses and Emotions" program announcement.

Conceptualizing Viewership: The Terms of Visual Engagement with Art in Late Imperial China (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Conceptualizing Viewership: The Terms of Visual Engagement with Art in Late Imperial China
Author: Kleutghen, Kristina
Abstract: The presentation "Conceptualizing Viewership: The Terms of Visual Engagement with Art in Late Imperial China" was given at the Universität Heidelberg, Germany, as part of the conference, "Begriffsgeschichte as Global Concept and Traveling Theory."
Date: 5/1/2016
Primary URL: N/A
Conference Name: "Begriffsgeschichte as Global Concept and Traveling Theory," Universität Heidelberg, Germany

The Materiality of Color in the Ancient Mediterranean (Book Section)
Title: The Materiality of Color in the Ancient Mediterranean
Author: Stager, Jennifer
Editor: Rachel Goldman
Abstract: This book chapter is part of a collection of 13 interdisciplinary essays that examine a wide range of topics, including the use and cultural significance of color in the Ancient World during the period 3000 B.C.- 600 A.D. The unifying theme of these essays is the exploration of colors that were preferred in ancient cultures, what social and cultural meanings were attached to them, and how a greater understanding of these cultures can be gained by examining how they used and perceived color. The essays cover the civilizations of Ancient China, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Mesoamerica, and the Islamic world.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://www.gorgiaspress.com/essays-in-global-color-history
Primary URL Description: URL link to publication description on the publishers website.
Access Model: Open Access
Publisher: Gorgias Press, LLC.
Book Title: Essays in Global Color History: Interpreting the Ancient Spectrum
ISBN: 978-1-4632-058

Torn Bodies for Pleasure: Classicism and Monstrosity in Picasso’s “Illustrations” of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses (Book Section)
Title: Torn Bodies for Pleasure: Classicism and Monstrosity in Picasso’s “Illustrations” of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses
Author: Stager, Jennifer
Editor: Michael Govan
Editor: Diana Magaloni
Abstract: Picasso & Rivera: Conversations Across Time explores the artistic dialogue between Pablo Picasso and Diego Rivera that spanned most of their careers. The book showcases nearly 150 iconic paintings, sculptures, and prints by both artists, along with objects from their native ancient Mediterranean and Pre- Columbian worlds. It gives an overview of their early training in national academies; important archaeological discoveries that occurred during their formative years; and their friendly and adversarial relationship in Montparnasse. Through a series of essays the book explores how the work of each artist was informed by artworks from the past.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: https://www.amazon.com/Picasso-Rivera-Conversations-Across-Time/dp/3791355554
Primary URL Description: URL link to publication detail on Amazon.com
Access Model: Open Access
Publisher: Prestel
Book Title: Picasso and Rivera: Conversations Across Time
ISBN: 978-3791355559

Picasso’s Narrative Classicism (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: Picasso’s Narrative Classicism
Abstract: This presentation was part of the LACMA Guest Lecture program on the subject “Modernism and Classicism, Picasso and Rivera,” presented in conjunction with the exhibition Picasso and Rivera: Conversations Across Time (December 4, 2016 – May 7, 2017). In this program the exhibition’s co-curator, Jennifer Stager, and contributing author to the related publication, Michele Greet, discussed the work of the two artists during the early 20th century. This event was moderated by Rachel Kaplan, a Wallis Annenberg Curatorial Fellow at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).
Author: Stager, Jennifer
Date: 1/21/2017
Location: Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
Primary URL: https://www.facebook.com/LACMA/videos/10154003930326566/
Primary URL Description: URL link to the LACMA video of this guest lecture program posted on the institution's official Facebook page.


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