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Products for grant RA-50117-12

RA-50117-12
Scholars-in-Residence Program
Khalil Muhammad, New York Public Library

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-50117-12

American Imperialism's Undead: The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism (Book) [show prizes]
Title: American Imperialism's Undead: The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism
Author: Raphael Dalleo
Abstract: As modern Caribbean politics and literature emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, Haiti, as the region's first independent state, stood as a source of inspiration for imagining decolonization and rooting regional identity in Africanness. Yet at precisely the same moment that anticolonialism was spreading throughout the Caribbean, Haiti itself was occupied by U.S. marines, a fact that regional political and cultural histories too often overlook. In "American Imperialism’s Undead", Raphael Dalleo examines how Caribbean literature and activism emerged in the shadow of the U.S. military occupation of Haiti (1915-34) and how that presence influenced the development of anticolonialism throughout the region. The occupation was a generative event for Caribbean activists such as C. L. R. James, George Padmore, and Marcus and Amy Jacques Garvey as well as for writers such as Claude McKay, Eric Walrond, and Alejo Carpentier. Dalleo provides new ways of understanding these luminaries, while also showing how other important figures such as Aimé Césaire, Arturo Schomburg, Claudia Jones, Frantz Fanon, Amy Ashwood Garvey, H. G. De Lisser, Luis Palés Matos, George Lamming, and Jean Rhys can be contextualized in terms of the occupation. By examining Caribbean responses to Haiti’s occupation, Dalleo underscores U.S. imperialism as a crucial if unspoken influence on anticolonial discourses and decolonization in the region. Without acknowledging the significance of the occupation of Haiti, our understanding of Atlantic history cannot be complete.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://www.worldcat.org/title/american-imperialisms-undead-the-occupation-of-haiti-and-the-rise-of-caribbean-anticolonialism/oclc/954733738&referer=brief_results
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780813938943
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

Black Movements: Performance and Cultural Politics (Book)
Title: Black Movements: Performance and Cultural Politics
Author: Soyica Diggs Colbert
Abstract: Black Movements analyzes how artists and activists of recent decades reference earlier freedom movements in order to imagine and produce a more expansive and inclusive democracy. The post–Jim Crow, post–apartheid, postcolonial era has ushered in a purportedly color blind society and along with it an assault on race-based forms of knowledge production and coalition formation. Soyica Diggs Colbert argues that in the late twentieth century race went “underground,” and by the twenty-first century race no longer functioned as an explicit marker of second-class citizenship. The subterranean nature of race manifests itself in discussions of the Trayvon Martin shooting that focus on his hoodie, an object of clothing that anyone can choose to wear, rather than focusing on structural racism; in discussions of the epidemic proportions of incarcerated black and brown people that highlight the individual’s poor decision making rather than the criminalization of blackness; in evaluations of black independence struggles in the Caribbean and Africa that allege these movements have accomplished little more than creating a black ruling class that mirrors the politics of its former white counterpart. Black Movements intervenes in these discussions by highlighting the ways in which artists draw from the past to create coherence about blackness in present and future worlds. Through an exploration of the way that black movements create circuits connecting people across space and time, Black Movements offers important interventions into performance, literary, diaspora, and African American studies.
Year: 2017
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
Type: Single author monograph
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Being Muslim: A Cultural History of Women of Color and American Islam (Book)
Title: Being Muslim: A Cultural History of Women of Color and American Islam
Author: Sylvia Chan-Malik
Abstract: For Sylvia Chan-Malik, Muslim womanhood is constructed through everyday and embodied acts of resistance, what she calls affective insurgency. In negotiating the histories of anti-Blackness, U.S. imperialism, and women’s rights of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Being Muslim explores how U.S. Muslim women’s identities are expressions of Islam as both Black protest religion and universal faith tradition. Through archival images, cultural texts, popular media, and interviews, the author maps how communities of American Islam became sites of safety, support, spirituality, and social activism, and how women of color were central to their formation. By accounting for American Islam’s rich histories of mobilization and community, Being Muslim brings insight to the resistance that all Muslim women must engage in the post-9/11 United States. From the stories that she gathers, Chan-Malik demonstrates the diversity and similarities of Black, Arab, South Asian, Latina, and multiracial Muslim women, and how American understandings of Islam have shifted against the evolution of U.S. white nationalism over the past century. In borrowing from the lineages of Black and women-of-color feminism, Chan-Malik offers us a new vocabulary for U.S. Muslim feminism, one that is as conscious of race, gender, sexuality, and nation, as it is region and religion.
Year: 2018
Publisher: New York University Press
Type: Single author monograph
Copy sent to NEH?: No

Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity (Book)
Title: Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity
Author: C. Riley Snorton
Abstract: In "Black on Both Sides," C. Riley Snorton identifies multiple intersections between blackness and transness from the mid-nineteenth century to present-day anti-black and anti-trans legislation and violence. Drawing on a deep and varied archive of materials, Snorton attends to how slavery and the production of racialized gender provided the foundations for an understanding of gender as mutable.
Year: 2017
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
Type: Single author monograph
Copy sent to NEH?: No


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