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Products for Grant RA-50126-14

RA-50126-14
Research Fellowships for Senior Scholars in the Humanities to Conduct their Projects in India
Philip Lutgendorf, American Institute of Indian Studies

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-50126-14

A European Library in 19th Century India: The Enlightenment World of Serfoji II of Tanjore (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: A European Library in 19th Century India: The Enlightenment World of Serfoji II of Tanjore
Author: Indira Peterson
Abstract: presentation at the India International Centre with Romila Thapar of JNU chair
Date: 10/18/2016
Primary URL: http://www.iicdelhi.nic.in/User_Panel/Programs.aspx?TypeID=1076
Conference Name: India International Centre, New Delhi

Drama, The Court, and the Public in Maratha Thanjavur: The Multilingual Yakshaganas of Shaji II (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Drama, The Court, and the Public in Maratha Thanjavur: The Multilingual Yakshaganas of Shaji II
Author: Indira Peterson
Abstract: This paper illuminates the Thanjavur Maratha ruler Shahji II (r. 1684-1712) innovative deployment of the Yakshagana dance drama genre as a key instrument for the court's self-presentation, as well as representations of its relationship with wider publics in the Tamil cultural region
Date: 10/19/2016
Primary URL: http://www.jnu.ac.in/Events/
Conference Name: Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi India

Amy Allocco organizes conference "To Take Place: Culture, Religion, and Home-making in and beyond South Asia" at the University of Madras (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: Amy Allocco organizes conference "To Take Place: Culture, Religion, and Home-making in and beyond South Asia" at the University of Madras
Author: Amy Allocco
Abstract: The conference, held on July 28-29, 2016, was organized by Amy Allocco, associate professor of Religious Studies at Elon University and James Ponniah, assistant professor in the Department of Christian Studies at University of Madras. The conference attracted more than 50 attendees from the South Indian city and featured 16 presenters from throughout India and five additional countries. Speakers addressed the means and practices by which migrants, displaced persons and various other subcommunities in South Asia establish physical, conceptual and emotional spaces that put them at home or give rise to conflict with other groups.
Date Range: July 28-29, 2016
Location: Chennai, India
Primary URL: https://www.elon.edu/e-net/Article/135203

A Storm of Songs: India and the Idea of the Bhakti Movement (Book)
Title: A Storm of Songs: India and the Idea of the Bhakti Movement
Author: John Stratton Hawley
Abstract: India celebrates itself as a nation of unity in diversity, but where does that sense of unity come from? One important source is a widely-accepted narrative called the “bhakti movement.” Bhakti is the religion of the heart, of song, of common participation, of inner peace, of anguished protest. The idea known as the bhakti movement asserts that between 600 and 1600 CE, poet-saints sang bhakti from India’s southernmost tip to its northern Himalayan heights, laying the religious bedrock upon which the modern state of India would be built. Challenging this canonical narrative, John Stratton Hawley clarifies the historical and political contingencies that gave birth to the concept of the bhakti movement. Starting with the Mughals and their Kachvaha allies, North Indian groups looked to the Hindu South as a resource that would give religious and linguistic depth to their own collective history. Only in the early twentieth century did the idea of a bhakti “movement” crystallize—in the intellectual circle surrounding Rabindranath Tagore in Bengal. Interactions between Hindus and Muslims, between the sexes, between proud regional cultures, and between upper castes and Dalits are crucially embedded in the narrative, making it a powerful political resource. A Storm of Songs ponders the destiny of the idea of the bhakti movement in a globalizing India. If bhakti is the beating heart of India, this is the story of how it was implanted there—and whether it can survive.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674187467
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780674187467
Copy sent to NEH?: No

The Quotidian Revolution: Vernacularization, Religion, and the Premodern Public Sphere in India (Book)
Title: The Quotidian Revolution: Vernacularization, Religion, and the Premodern Public Sphere in India
Author: Christian Novetzke
Abstract: In thirteenth-century Maharashtra, a new vernacular literature emerged to challenge the hegemony of Sanskrit, a language largely restricted to men of high caste. In a vivid and accessible idiom, this new Marathi literature inaugurated a public debate over the ethics of social difference grounded in the idiom of everyday life. The arguments of vernacular intellectuals pushed the question of social inclusion into ever-wider social realms, spearheading the development of a nascent premodern public sphere that valorized the quotidian world in sociopolitical terms. The Quotidian Revolution examines this pivotal moment of vernacularization in Indian literature, religion, and public life by investigating courtly donative Marathi inscriptions alongside the first extant texts of Marathi literature: the Lilacaritra (1278) and the Jñanesvari (1290). Novetzke revisits the influence of Chakradhar (c. 1194), the founder of the Mahanubhav religion, and Jnandev (c. 1271), who became a major figure of the Varkari religion, to observe how these avant-garde and worldly elites pursued a radical intervention into the social questions and ethics of the age. Drawing on political anthropology and contemporary theories of social justice, religion, and the public sphere, The Quotidian Revolution explores the specific circumstances of this new discourse oriented around everyday life and its lasting legacy: widening the space of public debate in a way that presages key aspects of Indian modernity and democracy.
Year: 2016
Primary URL: http://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-quotidian-revolution/9780231175807
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780231175807
Copy sent to NEH?: No

The Slow Boil: Street Food, Rights and Public Space in Mumbai (Book)
Title: The Slow Boil: Street Food, Rights and Public Space in Mumbai
Author: Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria
Abstract: Street food vendors are both a symbol and a scourge of Mumbai: cheap roadside snacks are enjoyed by all, but the people who make them dance on a razor's edge of legality. While neighborhood associations want the vendors off cluttered sidewalks, many Mumbaikers appreciate the convenient bargains they offer. In The Slow Boil, Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria draws on his long-term fieldwork with these vendors to make sense of the paradoxes within the city and, thus, to create a better understanding of urban space in general. Much urban studies literature paints street vendors either as oppressed and marginalized victims or as inventive premoderns. In contrast, Anjaria acknowledges that diverse political, economic, historic, and symbolic processes create contradictions in the vendors' everyday lives, like their illegality and proximity to the state, and their insecurity and permanence. Mumbai's disorderly sidewalks reflect the simmering tensions over livelihood, democracy, and rights that are central to the city but have long been overlooked. In The Slow Boil, these issues are not subsumed into a larger framework, but are explored on their own terms.
Year: 2016
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780804798228
Copy sent to NEH?: No


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