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Products for grant RA-50139-14

RA-50139-14
Long-Term Research Fellowships at The Huntington Library
Steve Hindle, Huntington Library

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RA-50139-14

How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States (Book)
Title: How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States
Author: Daniel Immerwahr
Abstract: We are familiar with maps that outline all fifty states. And we are also familiar with the idea that the United States is an “empire,” exercising power around the world. But what about the actual territories?the islands, atolls, and archipelagos?this country has governed and inhabited? In How to Hide an Empire, Daniel Immerwahr tells the fascinating story of the United States outside the United States. In crackling, fast-paced prose, he reveals forgotten episodes that cast American history in a new light. We travel to the Guano Islands, where prospectors collected one of the nineteenth century’s most valuable commodities, and the Philippines, site of the most destructive event on U.S. soil. In Puerto Rico, Immerwahr shows how U.S. doctors conducted grisly experiments they would never have conducted on the mainland and charts the emergence of independence fighters who would shoot up the U.S. Congress. In the years after World War II, Immerwahr notes, the United States moved away from colonialism. Instead, it put innovations in electronics, transportation, and culture to use, devising a new sort of influence that did not require the control of colonies. Rich with absorbing vignettes, full of surprises, and driven by an original conception of what empire and globalization mean today, How to Hide an Empire is a major and compulsively readable work of history.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.worldcat.org/title/how-to-hide-an-empire-a-history-of-the-greater-united-states/oclc/1036104286?referer=di&ht=edition
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 978-0374172145
Copy sent to NEH?: Yes

John Scarlett Davis, "The Interior of the British Institution Gallery, 1829" (Book Section)
Title: John Scarlett Davis, "The Interior of the British Institution Gallery, 1829"
Author: Catherine Roach
Editor: Martina Droth, Nathan Flis, & Michael Hatt
Abstract: "Britain in the World" presents highlights from the collection of the Yale Center for British Art. Included alongside iconic works -- such as George Stubbs's "Zebra," Sir Joshua Reynolds's "Miss Prue," and J. M. W. Turner's "Dort" -- are diverse and fascinating objects that range from the Tudor period to the present day. This beautifully illustrated volume offers a valuable glimpse into the Center's vast and varied holdings. It also reveals British art as a global phenomenon, shaped and characterized by cultural exchange, exploration, scientific discovery, and, crucially, by the long history of colonialism and empire. This book illustrates the myriad ways in which visible and invisible global connections are present in the visual and material culture of Britain.
Year: 2019
Publisher: Yale University Press
Book Title: Britain in the World: Highlights from the Yale Center for British Art

Painting with Fire: Sir Joshua Reynolds, Photography, and the Temporally Evolving Chemical Object (Book)
Title: Painting with Fire: Sir Joshua Reynolds, Photography, and the Temporally Evolving Chemical Object
Author: Matthew Hunter
Abstract: Painting with Fire shows how experiments with chemicals known to change visibly over the course of time transformed British pictorial arts of the long eighteenth century—and how they can alter our conceptions of photography today. As early as the 1670s, experimental philosophers at the Royal Society of London had studied the visual effects of dynamic combustibles. By the 1770s, chemical volatility became central to the ambitious paintings of Sir Joshua Reynolds, premier portraitist and first president of Britain’s Royal Academy of Arts. Valued by some critics for changing in time (and thus, for prompting intellectual reflection on the nature of time), Reynolds’s unstable chemistry also prompted new techniques of chemical replication among Matthew Boulton, James Watt, and other leading industrialists. In turn, those replicas of chemically decaying academic paintings were rediscovered in the mid-nineteenth century and claimed as origin points in the history of photography. Tracing the long arc of chemically produced and reproduced art from the 1670s through the 1860s, the book reconsiders early photography by situating it in relationship to Reynolds’s replicated paintings and the literal engines of British industry. By following the chemicals, Painting with Fire remaps familiar stories about academic painting and pictorial experiment amid the industrialization of chemical knowledge.
Year: 2020
Secondary URL: https://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo44165156.html
Secondary URL Description: Publisher's website
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Type: Single author monograph
ISBN: 9780226390390
Copy sent to NEH?: No


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