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Products for grant RQ-230528-15

RQ-230528-15
This Is Who We Are: Letters of the Dakota,1838-1878
Gwen Westerman, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RQ-230528-15

Letters from the Dakota, 1838-1878 (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Letters from the Dakota, 1838-1878
Author: Gwen N. Westerman
Author: Glenn M. Wasicuna
Abstract: "Letters from the Dakota, 1838-1878" describes the English translation of first-person narratives of those Dakota people writing in their own language during the mid-nineteenth century. The time period selected for this project encompasses the years of most drastic change for Dakota people--treaty negotiations, land loss, war, imprisonment, exile, and the beginnings of recovery. These letters provide insights into the daily lives of prominent and ordinary Dakota people, their relationships with the federal government, and their attempts to negotiate rapid changes brought on by farming, Christianity, and settlers who overran their lands. This presentation begins with a short general introduction that provides historical and interpretive information including explanations of events and historical figures relevant to an understanding of the importance of the letters and how they came to be written. The process of translating these letters and researching the historical context is described to demonstrate their significance in preserving the Dakota language, both historically and in the present day, as well as highlighting the cultural practices surrounding the translations and translators over time.
Date: 10/15/2016
Primary URL: https://www.amphilsoc.org/conference/translatingconference/papers
Primary URL Description: Main conference paper site for Translating Across Time and Space: Endangered Languages, Cultural Revitalization, and the Work of History.
Secondary URL: https://www.amphilsoc.org/cnair/conference-translating-time-space
Secondary URL Description: Call for papers for APS conference Translating Across Time and Space: Endangered Languages, Cultural Revitalization, and the Work of History.
Conference Name: American Philosophical Society Translating Across Time and Space: Endangered Languages, Cultural Revitalization, and the Work of History

From Gallows to Prison: Letters from the Dakota, 1862-1865 (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: From Gallows to Prison: Letters from the Dakota, 1862-1865
Author: Gwen N. Westerman
Abstract: "From Gallows to Prison: Letters from the Dakota, 1862-1865” describes the English translation of first-person narratives of those Dakota people writing in their own language during the mid-nineteenth century. The time period selected for this presentation encompasses the years of most drastic change for Dakota people—treaty negotiations, land loss, war, imprisonment, and exile. As such, the voices represented in these letters have been silent for 130 to 175 years. These letters provide insights into the lives of prominent and ordinary Dakota people held in prison in Minnesota and Iowa after the war with the United States in 1862, their opinions about their relationships with the federal government, and their attempts to negotiate the rapid changes brought on by war, imprisonment, and exile. A Dakota perspective—observations of the world written in their own words in their own language—will challenge accepted representations of their issues and concerns as written by missionaries and historians. This presentation begins with a short general introduction that provides historical and interpretive information including explanations of events and historical figures relevant to an understanding of the importance of the letters and how they came to be written. The process of translating these letters and researching the historical context will be described in order to demonstrate their importance in preserving the Dakota language, both historically and in the present day, as well as highlighting the impact of prison conditions on the context of their letters.
Date: 1/5/2017
Primary URL: https://apps.mla.org/conv_listings_detail?prog_id=28&year=2017
Primary URL Description: Session description for panel presentation Writing (against) the Prison sponsored by the Forum Transdisciplinary Connections (TC) Race & Ethnicity Studies
Secondary URL: https://www.mla.org/Convention/MLA-2017
Secondary URL Description: Main website for the Modern Language Association Convention
Conference Name: Modern Language Association Convention

In Their Own Words: The Eloquence of 19th-Century Dakota Letter Writers (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: In Their Own Words: The Eloquence of 19th-Century Dakota Letter Writers
Author: Gwen Nell Westerman
Abstract: This panel focuses on the translations of first-person narratives of those Dakota people writing in their own language during the mid-nineteenth century and their experiences here in the heart of Mni Sota Makoce, the Dakota homeland now called Minnesota. The translation from Dakota to English, along with historical and biographical context, will provide access to a body of epistolary work previously unavailable to scholars of Dakota history and culture, of Minnesota and Plains storytelling, and of American Indian policies during the Civil War. Beyond local and regional interest, these translated letters also have significance for scholars in the fields of epistolary studies, internment camp studies, as well as truth commissions and reconciliation. Gwen Westerman will present background on the translation project and literary aspects of the letters.
Date: 10/27/2017
Primary URL: http://www.westernlit.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/2017-Program-as-of-10-23-17.pdf
Primary URL Description: Western Literature Association Conference Program page with participants' name and titles listed
Secondary URL: http://www.westernlit.org/wla-conference-2017/
Secondary URL Description: Home page for WLA Conference
Conference Name: Western Literature Association Conference

Words for Today: Dakota Language Then and Now (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Words for Today: Dakota Language Then and Now
Author: Glenn M. Wasicuna
Abstract: This panel focuses on the translations of first-person narratives of those Dakota people writing in their own language during the mid-nineteenth century and their experiences here in the heart of Mni Sota Makoce, the Dakota homeland now called Minnesota. The translation from Dakota to English, along with historical and biographical context, will provide access to a body of epistolary work previously unavailable to scholars of Dakota history and culture, of Minnesota and Plains storytelling, and of American Indian policies during the Civil War. Beyond local and regional interest, these translated letters also have significance for scholars in the fields of epistolary studies, internment camp studies, as well as truth commissions and reconciliation. Glenn Wasicuna will compare 19th-century and contemporary language usage and discuss the cultural legacies of the letter writers.
Date: 10/27/2017
Primary URL: http://www.westernlit.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/2017-Program-as-of-10-23-17.pdf
Primary URL Description: Western Literature Association Conference Program page with participants' name and titles listed.
Secondary URL: http://www.westernlit.org
Secondary URL Description: WLA Homepage
Conference Name: Western Literature Association Conference

World-building through Translating the Dakota Letters (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: World-building through Translating the Dakota Letters
Author: Rachel Schienke
Abstract: This panel focuses on the translations of first-person narratives of those Dakota people writing in their own language during the mid-nineteenth century and their experiences here in the heart of Mni Sota Makoce, the Dakota homeland now called Minnesota. The translation from Dakota to English, along with historical and biographical context, will provide access to a body of epistolary work previously unavailable to scholars of Dakota history and culture, of Minnesota and Plains storytelling, and of American Indian policies during the Civil War. Beyond local and regional interest, these translated letters also have significance for scholars in the fields of epistolary studies, internment camp studies, as well as truth commissions and reconciliation. Rachel Schienke will talk about decoding Dakota worldviews through the transcription and translation process.
Date: 10/27/2017
Primary URL: http://http://www.westernlit.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/2017-Program-as-of-10-23-17.pdf
Primary URL Description: Western Literature Association Conference Program page with participants' name and titles listed.
Secondary URL: http://www.westernlit.org
Secondary URL Description: WLA Homepage
Conference Name: Western Literature Association

In Our Own Words: The Significance of Dakota Scholarship (Public Lecture or Presentation)
Title: In Our Own Words: The Significance of Dakota Scholarship
Abstract: The 2017 Joseph Harper Cash Memorial Lecture The University of South Dakota Despite the historical and linguistic significance of this collection of letters written by Dakota people in the mid-nineteenth century, it will be extremely important to provide a critical introduction to establish the historical and intellectual contexts. Knowing the extreme conditions under which many of the letters were written and the ultimate exile of the Dakota people from their homeland will contribute to a better understanding of the texts. Including digital facsimiles of the original letters will help establish the literacy and eloquence of Dakota people, and American Indians as group, during a period in history when they were thought to be illiterate.
Author: Gwen N. Westerman
Date: 03/23/2017
Location: Vermillion, SD
Primary URL: http://calendar.usd.edu/cal/event/eventView.do?b=de&calPath=/public/cals/MainCal&guid=CAL-406ca799-596e5998-0159-706e2be2-00006624demobedework@mysite.edu&recurrenceId=
Primary URL Description: University of South Dakota Public Events Calendar


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