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Products for Grant RQ-50718-13

RQ-50718-13
An Edition of the Old English Translation of Bede’s Historia Ecclesiastica
Sharon Rowley, Christopher Newport University

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RQ-50718-13

‘Translation Style, Lexical Systems, Dialect Vocabulary, and the Manuscript Transmission of the Old English Bede.’ (Article)
Title: ‘Translation Style, Lexical Systems, Dialect Vocabulary, and the Manuscript Transmission of the Old English Bede.’
Author: Greg Waite
Abstract: This article explores the co-existence of Angliand dialect words with common Old English synonyms within particular semantic fields in the Old English translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History. This phenomenon arises out of the writer’s distinctive method of close translation, and the deliberate strategies of lexical and stylistic control that he exercised. In this article I focus upon selected examples, including the vocabulary of death and dying, as a case study of how understanding of the dialect vocabulary of the OEB and its putative Mercian archetype can be extended. By comparing sets of synonyms – including dialect words like leoran ‘to go, depart, die’ – with the Latin terms that they translate, I seek to demonstrate that the lexical systems identifiable within the text have important implications for reconstructing the hypothetical archetype, and also for understanding the varied ways in which West Saxon scribes undertook modifications of the text.
Year: 2014
Access Model: subscription only
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Medium Ævum 83.1
Publisher: Medium Ævum 83.1

‘The Preface to the Old English Bede: Authorship, Transmission, and Connection with the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List’ (Article)
Title: ‘The Preface to the Old English Bede: Authorship, Transmission, and Connection with the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List’
Author: Greg Waite
Abstract: Lexical and stylistic features indicate that the Preface to the Old English Bede was composed by a writer different from the anonymous Mercian who translated the body of the text. The Preface, therefore, cannot be taken to reveal aspects of the original translator’s aims or attitude to the text. Recently discovered collations of the burnt manuscript London, British Library, Cotton Otho B. xi, made by John Smith prior to the 1731 fire, provide further insight, indicating that a copy of the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List was attached to the Preface by the mid tenth century. Thus the origins of the Preface may lie in an Alfredian or post-Alfredian initiative to disseminate the translation at some time later than its actual creation.
Year: 2015
Access Model: subscription only
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Anglo-Saxon England 44
Publisher: Cambridge Journals

‘A New Discovery: John Smith’s Collations for his Edition of the OE Bede (1722)’ (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: ‘A New Discovery: John Smith’s Collations for his Edition of the OE Bede (1722)’
Author: Greg Waite
Abstract: This paper describes the discovery of hand-written collations in a British Library copy of Abraham Wheloc’s 1643/44 edition of Bede, and discusses the significance of this material. Although this copy of Wheloc has resided in the British Library collection since 1837, its important annotations have remained unnoticed, until observed in December 2013.
Date: 8/6/2015
Primary URL: http://www.isas2015.com/
Conference Name: International Society of Anglo-Saxonists

‘A Tale of Two Texts’ (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: ‘A Tale of Two Texts’
Author: Greg Waite
Abstract: This paper presents an overview of the history and challenges of editing the Old English version of Bede's Ecclesiastical History.
Date: 6/9/2015
Primary URL: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/IMC2015/imc2015.html
Conference Name: Leeds International Medieval Congress

"The Long Ninth Century and the Prose of King Alfred's Reign" (Article)
Title: "The Long Ninth Century and the Prose of King Alfred's Reign"
Author: Sharon M. Rowley
Abstract: This article examines the history of the scholarship of the Old English prose of the ninth century and the reign of King Alfred the Great. Looking at the manuscripts, language, Latin sources, and the transmission of the texts, it argues that Old English prose existed before Alfred, then changed and developed during Alfred’s reign. Analyzing passages from key Old English prose texts, including the Old English version of Bede’s Ecclesiastical History, Wærferth’s translation of Gregory the Great’s Dialogues, and Alfred’s translations of Gregory’s Pastoral Care and the first fifty Psalms, this essay argues that early Old English prose was highly learned and in dialogue with many of the primary texts of the medieval Western world.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/
Access Model: subscription only
Format: Other
Periodical Title: Oxford Handbooks Online
Publisher: Oxford University Press

"Phantoms of Bede" (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Phantoms of Bede"
Author: Sharon M Rowley
Abstract: This paper re-examines at the editorial dilemma presented by the divergent translation of Book III, Chapters 14-18 in one branch of the OEHE manuscripts as a question of source. This dilemma is compounded by other readings shared across branches, and complicated by the survival of chapter headings written to fit one branch in a manuscript of the other branch. None of these problems are new, but they are problems that seem to arise from the fact that the HE and its vernacular counterpart circulated together in Anglo-Saxon England. If it is too circular to say that a palimpsest in Bodleian Library, MS Tanner 10 used the OEHE as a source for itself, it may be safe to say that the OEHE provides one of the clearest surviving examples of a text that was revised and restored (variably) by reference to both itself and its Latin source. I am in the process of editing the OEHE Book III.14-18, and hope to shed new light on the question of the divergence because I have access to materials unknown to Thomas Miller, the last editor of the OEHE. These are: Lawrence Nowell’s transcription of the burned Cotton MS and John Smith’s collation of that MS in a copy of Wheloc’s 1644 edition.
Date: 5/14/2016
Conference Name: International Medieval Congress, Western Michigan University


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