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Products for Grant RQ-50842-14

RQ-50842-14
Edition of The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians (1897), by Franz Boas with George Hunt
Aaron Glass, Bard Graduate Center

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RQ-50842-14

“Recuperating the Boasian Archive: A Collaborative Effort to Reunite Objects, Records, and Indigenous Knowledge.” (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: “Recuperating the Boasian Archive: A Collaborative Effort to Reunite Objects, Records, and Indigenous Knowledge.”
Author: Aaron Glass
Author: Judith Berman
Abstract: Franz Boas's 1897 monograph, The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, was a landmark in anthropology for its integrative approach to museum collections, photographs and sound recordings as well as text. A result of participant observation and extensive collaboration with indigenous partners—especially George Hunt—the book set a standard for both ethnography and museum practice. However, both Boas and Hunt remained dissatisfied with the published text, laboring for decades to correct and supplement a volume that would forever mediate global knowledge of the Kwakwaka’wakw. They left behind a vast archive of unpublished materials (ranging from interlinear fieldnotes to watercolour drawings, touched-up photographs to wax cylinder recordings) relevant to the creation and afterlife of this seminal text and its related museum collections. These materials are now widely distributed across institutional, disciplinary, and international borders so that related ethnographic records have become fractured, thereby limiting the documentary potential at each site and the research possibilities for both scholars and indigenous communities. This paper discusses a current collaborative project to create a new, annotated critical edition of the work that unites published and unpublished records with one another and with current Kwakwaka’wakw knowledge in an interactive, multimedia website. Archival revelations about the truly co-authored nature of the original text allow us to better situate the contexts and methods of creating ethnographic knowledge in terms of the indigenous epistemologies it purports to represent. Moreover, new digital technologies can harness multimedia to return sensory richness to Boas and Hunt’s synthetic text, to reactivate disparate and long dormant museum collections, and to restore cultural patrimony to its indigenous inheritors.
Date: 05/08/2013
Primary URL: http://www.cas-sca.ca/conference/past-conferences
Primary URL Description: CASCA Website with links to past conferences
Conference Name: Presented at the invited session "Unsettling Records: Images and Objects," Canadian Anthropology Society-La Société Canadienne d'Anthropologie Conference, Victoria, BC

"Reassembling The Social Organization: Collaborative Ethnography and Digital Media in the Making and Remaking of Franz Boas’s 1897 Monograph." (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Reassembling The Social Organization: Collaborative Ethnography and Digital Media in the Making and Remaking of Franz Boas’s 1897 Monograph."
Author: Aaron Glass
Author: Judith Berman
Abstract: Franz Boas's 1897 monograph, The Social Organization and Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, was a landmark in anthropology for its integrative approach to ethnography, the use of multiple media, and the collaborative role of Boas’s indigenous partner George Hunt. Not only did the volume draw on existing museum collections from around the world, the two men also left behind a vast and now widely distributed archive of unpublished materials relevant to the creation and afterlife of this seminal text, including hundreds of pages of Hunt’s corrections and emendations. This paper discusses an international collaborative project to create a new, annotated critical edition of the book that unites published and unpublished materials with one another and with current Kwakwaka’wakw knowledge in a multimedia online format. The paper will catalogue the range of archival materials at issue and present an interactive prototype for the digital edition that attempts to re-embed ethnographic knowledge within indigenous epistemological frameworks and hereditary protocols for access. While at a preliminary stage of design, working through the functionality and interface of the project prototype during the early research phase has raised key technical, ethical, and theoretical questions about the contexts and methods of collaborative ethnography—and the politics of authority and authorship—both in the original volume and in the newly annotated edition.
Date: 11/08/2015
Primary URL: https://aaa.confex.com/aaa/2015/webprogram/Session14778.html
Primary URL Description: Session listing at AAA conference site.
Conference Name: Presented at the session "Refamiliarizing The Estranged: Digital Representation of Indigenous Peoples Through Sharing, Collaboration, and Negotiation," American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Denver, CO

"Reassembling The Social Organization: Museums, Collaboration, and Digital Media in the Making and Remaking of Franz Boas’s 1897 Monograph." (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: "Reassembling The Social Organization: Museums, Collaboration, and Digital Media in the Making and Remaking of Franz Boas’s 1897 Monograph."
Author: Aaron Glass
Author: Judith Berman
Author: Rainer Hatoum
Abstract: Franz Boas's 1897 monograph, The Social Organization and Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, was a landmark in anthropology for its integrative approach to ethnography, the use of multiple media, and the collaborative role of Boas’s indigenous partner George Hunt. Not only did the volume draw on existing museum collections from around the world, the two men also left behind a vast and now widely distributed archive of unpublished materials relevant to the creation and afterlife of this seminal text, including hundreds of pages of Hunt’s corrections and emendations. This paper discusses an international and intercultural collaborative project to create a new, annotated critical edition of the book--in both print and digital formats--that unites published and unpublished materials with one another and with current Kwakwaka’wakw knowledge. We catalogue the range of museum collections and archival materials at issue and present an interactive prototype for the digital edition that re-embeds ethnographic knowledge within indigenous epistemological frameworks and hereditary protocols for access. This unprecedented effort within anthropology promises new ways of using digital media to link together disparate collections and Native communities in order to produce a critical historiography of the book while recuperating long dormant ethnographic materials for use in current and future cultural revitalization.
Date: 07/20/2016
Primary URL: http://www.easaonline.org/conferences/easa2016/index.shtml
Primary URL Description: Main EASA 2016 conference site
Conference Name: Presented at the session "Re-visioning Material Anthropological Legacies for Cosmos-optimal Futures,"European Association of Social Anthropologists Conference, Milan, Italy

“Reassembling The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians: Toward a Collaborative Critical Edition of Franz Boas and George Hunt’s Pioneering 1897 Monograph” (Conference/Institute/Seminar)
Title: “Reassembling The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians: Toward a Collaborative Critical Edition of Franz Boas and George Hunt’s Pioneering 1897 Monograph”
Author: Aaron Glass
Author: Judith Berman
Abstract: In 1897, anthropologist Franz Boas published The Social Organization and the Secret Societies of the Kwakiutl Indians, a synthesis of his initial research on the Northwest Coast with materials authored by his Indigenous collaborator, George Hunt. Although highly influential, the monograph remained incomplete and fractured, and extensive archival materials relating to its origins and afterlives were scattered across two continents. This seminar will bring together an international team whose aim is to synthesize historic and contemporary ethnographic data with community perspectives in three overlapping realms: 1) the incorporation of Kwakwaka’wakw cultural ontology into the project’s metadata structure and content; 2) a set of research questions that cross sub-disciplinary boundaries and forms of ethnographic media; and, 3) the suitability for publication of potentially sensitive ceremonial and genealogical materials. This is an unprecedented effort within anthropology and the humanities, promising new ways of using ethnography and digital media to link together disparate archives, museums, textual repositories, and contemporary Native communities.
Date Range: October 25–27, 2016
Location: School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Primary URL: http://sarweb.org/index.php?2016seminar_kwakiutl-p:2016_seminars
Primary URL Description: Online listing for the seminar


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