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Products for grant RZ-255635-17

RZ-255635-17
Archaeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation and Movement in Prehistoric Jordan
Lisa Maher, University of California, Berkeley

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RZ-255635-17

Archeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation in Prehistoric Jordan (Web Resources)
Title: Archeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation in Prehistoric Jordan
Author: Lisa Maher
Abstract: Archaeological Investigation of Hunter-Gatherer Aggregation and Movement in Prehistoric Jordan
Year: 2017
Primary URL: http://tdar.org

Kharaneh IV Project (Web Resources)
Title: Kharaneh IV Project
Author: Lisa Maher
Author: Danielle Macdonald
Abstract: The Kharaneh IV project explores the nature of interaction and aggregation at the end of the Pleistocene through the multi-component Early and Middle Epipalaeolithic site Kharaneh IV, Jordan. The high density of artifacts, repeated occupation, and the presence of multiple habitation structures suggests that Kharaneh IV was a hunter-gatherer aggregation site—a focal point on the landscape for community interaction. To address long-term changes and explore the nature of hunter-gatherer behavior at the cusp of agriculture, this project examines the high-resolution archaeological record of multi-season, prolonged, and repeated habitation of the region’s largest and densest hunter-gatherer aggregation site.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://kharaneh.com/
Primary URL Description: Kharaneh IV Project Website

Flintknapping: Merging Body and Mind (Film/TV/Video Broadcast or Recording)
Title: Flintknapping: Merging Body and Mind
Writer: Felicia De Pena
Director: N/A
Producer: N/A
Abstract: "Flintknapping: Merging Mind and Body", ARF Brownbag (UC Berkeley), 4 April 2018. My work is focused on situating the transmission of flintknapping knowledge between mobile Epipaleolithic (20,000 - 10,500 BP) hunter-gatherer peoples of the Levant through chaîne opératoire. By refitting bladelet cores at Kharaneh IV, Jordan, I strive to identify how individuals learned to flintknap, from raw material acquisition through the production of the final tool. I view the knowledge transmission process as a proxy for culture, as apprentices took on new ideas and identities to fit within a community of practice, the apprentice may have lost (or maintained) kinship ties yet subscribed to a more meaningful relationship within their community of practice. Kharaneh IV is an Early and Middle Epipaleolithic aggregation site well -situated for this research to examine the learning process due to its well-preserved stratigraphy numerous caches, and hut structures, which allows for observation of repetitive practices and identification of changes in technique. Current (and future) experimental flintknapping events in conjunction with 3D imaging and core refitting have been employed to establish baseline knowledge regarding the relationship between skill level and social structures that influence the production process.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=CD0F7VWxdvI
Primary URL Description: YouTube recording of public talk.
Access Model: Open access
Format: Video

2018 Excavations at the Epipalaeolithic Site of Kharaneh IV (Report)
Title: 2018 Excavations at the Epipalaeolithic Site of Kharaneh IV
Author: Danielle A. Macdonald
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Abstract: From June 9-July 12 2018, the Epipalaeolithic Foragers of Azraq Project (EFAP), University of California, Berkeley and University of Tulsa, conducted excavations at the Epipalaeolithic site of Kharaneh IV. The 2018 excavation at Kharaneh IV is the seventh field season at the site, focused on exploring the nature of prehistoric (Late Pleistocene) occupation of Kharaneh IV. During this season we completed excavation on an Early Epipalaeolithic hut structure (Structure 2) discovered in the 2010 season. The goal of the 2018 excavation season was to fully excavate Structure 2 to understand the distribution of artifacts with the structure and the relationship between the structure and the surrounding deposits. This year’s excavations have prepared us for targeting specific new areas for work, namely continuing to excavate several hut features during future field seasons.
Date: 7/30/2018
Access Model: Subscription Only

Reconstructing Daily Life in Prehistory: Using micromorphology to explore the use of space. (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Reconstructing Daily Life in Prehistory: Using micromorphology to explore the use of space.
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Abstract: Ethnographic studies of hunter-gatherer societies reveal a richness of lifeways that weave together interrelated aspects of society, economy, technology and symbolism. Yet, reconstructions of the lifeways of Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers often involves working from a highly fragmented and only partially preserved archaeological record. Here, I assess our current understandings of the Palaeolithic and Epipalaeolithic of Southwest Asia based on the contributions of several foundational interdisciplinary long-term research projects in the region, with a specific focus on those employing microscale analyses.
Date: 12/15/2018
Conference Name: Cultural history of PaleoAsia: Integrative research on the formative processes of modern human cultures in Asia

Living Landscapes (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Living Landscapes
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Abstract: How can knowledge of the past be developed and transformed so that it informs understandings of the present and future? The Center for Japanese Studies at UC Berkeley presents the workshop Living Landscapes: Time, Knowledge and Ecology. This workshop invites researchers in archaeology, anthropology, agroecology, sociology and geography to explore the ways in which different forms of environmental knowledge persist through time, are manifest in landscapes, and remain relevant to contemporary sustainability challenges.
Date: 11/9/2018
Primary URL: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/townsend.html?event_ID=121057&date=2018-11-09
Conference Name: Living Landscapes: Time, Knowledge and Ecology

How Do We Identify a Hunter-Gatherer? Is There a Mismatch Between an Archaeological and an Anthropological Hunter-Gatherer? (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: How Do We Identify a Hunter-Gatherer? Is There a Mismatch Between an Archaeological and an Anthropological Hunter-Gatherer?
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Abstract: In Southwest Asia, the archaeological record of the late Pleistocene exhibits a wide diversity of economic, technological, social and symbolic practices, providing an increasingly nuanced picture of prehistoric behavior. Traditional approaches that focused on the distinctions between hunter-gatherers and food-producers are proving overly simplistic as economic categories are blurred, and the social and ideological practices of these peoples are emphasized. Isolating economic events are difficult, as are reconstructing the impetuses and processes by which these events might have occurred. Much research on contemporary hunter-gatherers has abandoned economic labels in favor of understanding and contextualizing hunter-gatherer ontologies. With a rich dataset over the transition from hunter-gatherer to food-producer in Southwest Asia, we are beginning to explore the value of focusing on the social and ideological worlds of these Pleistocene groups. Much of this work, however, relies on ethnographic analogy and requires a critical approach to its use. With recognition of a ‘long Neolithic’ (and debates about whether this is a valid approach to transition), one must ask whether there is a mismatch between archaeological and anthropological usage of the term ‘hunter-gatherer’? Is ethnoarchaeology and ethnography relevant for identifying, defining and interpreting the behavior of archaeological hunter-gatherers? These issues are explored here using the Epipalaeolithic site of Kharaneh IV and the concept of place-making as a case study.
Date: 7/23/2018
Conference Name: Hunter-Gatherers, Farmers and the Long Neolithic’. Twelfth International Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS 12)

Artistic Traditions in the Early and Middle Epipalaeolithic: Kharaneh IV in Perspective (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Artistic Traditions in the Early and Middle Epipalaeolithic: Kharaneh IV in Perspective
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Author: Danielle A. Macdonald
Abstract: Artistic objects are thought to be one of the hallmarks of the Natufian period, marking a florescence of artistic behavior appearing prior to the origins of agriculture. However, with continuing research into Early and Middle Epipalaeolithic sites in the Levant, new discoveries of ‘symbolic’ artifacts are increasing our understanding of even earlier artistic and symbolic pursuits. In this paper we present an engraved plaquette from the Middle Epipalaeolithic context of Kharaneh IV, eastern Jordan. Using white-light confocal microscopy, we analyze manufacturing traces to identify the gestures and tools used to create the plaquette. This artifact, although the only engraved piece recovered from Kharaneh IV thus far, links into wider networks of Epipalaeolithic interaction and cultural exchange. Placing the Kharaneh IV engraved object into regional context with other Early/Middle Epipalaeolithic artistic artifacts, we explore wider networks of interaction prior to the Natufian.
Date: 4/11/2018
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting

Becoming Neolithic or Being a Hunter-Gatherer? Reframing the origins of agriculture through a longue durée perspective (Conference Paper/Presentation)
Title: Becoming Neolithic or Being a Hunter-Gatherer? Reframing the origins of agriculture through a longue durée perspective
Author: Danielle A. Macdonald
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Abstract: Searching for the origin points of major cultural revolutions and transitions has long been a driver of archaeological research, yet led to research focused on perceived boundaries, rather than continuity. Research into the origins of so-called modern human behavior, the origins of social complexity, the earliest domesticates, among others, all focus on defining moments of change that may be undetectable in the archaeological record. Perhaps some of the most enduring archaeological questions revolve around the ‘origins of agriculture’. In this paper, we explore changing historical conceptions of the ‘origins of agriculture’ in Southwest Asia in archaeological discourse and how, through the lens of the longue durée, we can trace aspects of material culture, human action, and complex human-landscape dynamics in deep time. Using examples from the Epipalaeolithic of eastern Jordan, we address current debates on Neolithization by exploring the implications of perspectives that focus on ‘becoming’ Neolithic and ‘being’ a hunter-gatherer. Through this perspective we discuss different scales of material culture analysis; from the ‘ethnographic’ lens identifying individual behaviors in the past, to the longue durée of material culture trends. This multi-scalar perspective gives insights into how we construct cultural boundaries and understand change during the ‘origins of agriculture’.
Date: 4/12/2018
Conference Name: Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting

Meat outside the freezer: Drying, smoking, salting and sealing meat in fat at an Epipalaeolithic megasite in eastern Jordan (Article)
Title: Meat outside the freezer: Drying, smoking, salting and sealing meat in fat at an Epipalaeolithic megasite in eastern Jordan
Author: Anna Spyrou
Author: Lisa A. Maher
Author: Danielle A. Macdonald
Author: Louise Martin
Author: Andrew Garrard
Abstract: Even though pivotal for understanding many aspects of human behaviour, preservation and storage of animal resources has not received great attention from archaeologists. One could argue that the main problem lies in the difficulties of demonstrating meat storage archaeologically due to the lack of direct evidence. This paper represents an attempt to refine zooarchaeological methods for the recognition of meat preservation and storage at prehistoric sites. Drawing on the faunal assemblage from Kharaneh IV, an Early/Middle Epipalaeolithic aggregation site in eastern Jordan, this study demonstrates that a combination of taphonomic and contextual analyses alongside ethnographic information may indeed lead archaeologists to insights not directly available from the archaeological record. The empirical evidence presented here contributes to the archaeological visibility of meat preservation and storage, providing a clearer concept of the nature of these practices in preagricultural societies.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaa.2019.02.004
Primary URL Description: Article in Journal of Anthropological Archaeology
Access Model: Subscription Only
Format: Journal
Publisher: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology


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