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Products for grant RZ-266172-19

RZ-266172-19
Below The Line: The Feuilleton, the Public Sphere, and Modern Jewish Cultures
Shachar Pinsker, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RZ-266172-19

“Multilingual Anxiety and the Invention of the Hebrew Native: A Reading of a Hebrew Feuilleton by S. Ben Zion” (Article)
Title: “Multilingual Anxiety and the Invention of the Hebrew Native: A Reading of a Hebrew Feuilleton by S. Ben Zion”
Author: Roni Henig
Abstract: This article explores the relationship between multilingualism, the attempted revival of Hebrew speech, and the sense of muteness that accompanied Hebrew literary production in the first decade of the twentieth century. It does so through a close reading of a Hebrew feuilleton, written by Simhah Ben Zion and published in 1907 in the first issue of the Palestine-based Hebrew journal Ha-’omer. At the center of the feuilleton is a living wonderment: an eight-year-old girl—the narrator’s daughter—who speaks no fewer than eight languages, one for each year of her life. Although the narrator and his wife, both ardent Zionists, struggle to maintain a Hebrew-speaking home, they soon learn that their sociolinguistic reality does not coincide with the monolingual fantasy of imposing Hebrew as an exclusive, isolated language. The article argues that in the midst of an endeavor to reterritorialize Hebrew creativity in Palestine and constitute the Hebrew-speaking native, Ben Zion’s feuilleton satirically narrates Hebrew revival as a chaotic Babel, revealing not only the failures of this project but also its latent anxieties.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://arcade.stanford.edu/dibur/multilingual-anxiety-and-invention-hebrew-native-reading-hebrew-feuilleton-s-ben-zion
Access Model: Open Access
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Dibur: Literary Journal
Publisher: Arcade: A Digital Salon

“Reflections on the Possibilities of German-Jewish Authorship and Literature” (Article)
Title: “Reflections on the Possibilities of German-Jewish Authorship and Literature”
Author: Liliane Weissberg
Abstract: The article explores the relations between feuilletons and German-Jewish writers.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/titles/format/9781612497303
Format: Other
Periodical Title: The Future of the German-Jewish Past: Memory and the Question of Antisemitism
Publisher: Purdue University Press

Coffeehouses, Journalism, and the Rise of Modern Jewish Literary Culture (Article)
Title: Coffeehouses, Journalism, and the Rise of Modern Jewish Literary Culture
Author: Shachar Pinsker
Abstract: This article focuses on the role of the coffeehouse in the Haskalah and its literatures. Scholars of modern Jewish literature have not paid enough attention to the coffeehouse and to its important role as a new kind of Jewish space, one that enabled and fostered novel forms of journalism and literature. This is especially true for the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the period associated mostly with the Haskalah. Thinking about Haskalah culture in spatial terms usually relies on a dichotomy between the synagogue and secular institutions, the idea that religion constituted the single moral authority and was exclusively associated with the synagogue, the house of study, and other traditional Jewish spaces. This article focuses on the importance of the café as a thirdspace, in Edward Soja’s terms, one that does not fit comfortably in the dichotomy between religious and secular spaces (or other dichotomies such as public and private, inside and outside). The café was crucial for the creation of modern Jewish culture, and it helps us to identify and understand the contiguities of the modern Jewish literary complex.
Year: 2021
Primary URL: https://www.jstor.org/journal/prooftexts
Access Model: Subscription only
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Prooftexts
Publisher: Indiana University Press


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