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Products for grant RZ-51441-12

RZ-51441-12
Archive of Haitian Religion and Culture
Benjamin Hebblethwaite, University of Florida

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=RZ-51441-12

Archive of Haitan and Religion Cultures (Web Resources)
Title: Archive of Haitan and Religion Cultures
Author: Benjamin Hebblewaite
Abstract: The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a cooperative digital library for resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. dLOC provides access to digitized versions of Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections.
Year: 2012
Primary URL: http://www.dloc.com

Historical linguistic approaches to Haitian creole: Vodou rites, spirit names and songs: the founders' contributions to Asogwe Vodou (Book Section)
Title: Historical linguistic approaches to Haitian creole: Vodou rites, spirit names and songs: the founders' contributions to Asogwe Vodou
Author: Benjamin Hebblethwaite
Editor: Jessica Stefanie Barzen
Editor: Hanna Lene Geiger
Editor: Silke Jansen
Abstract: The chapter explores Haitian Creole Vodou rites, spirit names, and songs by means of a historical linguistic approach that is rooted in etymological research. That work in lexicology informs historical linguistic theory that aims to explain the forms displayed in the tradition of Asogwe Vodou.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://ufdcimages.uflib.ufl.edu/AA/00/02/55/96/00001/Hebblethwaite_Spirit_Migration.pdf
Primary URL Description: Author's page on the University of Florida Libraries website.
Access Model: Chapter in a book
Publisher: Tubingen, Germany: Narr Verlag
Book Title: Hispaniola -- Island of Encounters
ISBN: 9783823369011

The Scapegoating of Haitian Vodou Religion: David Brooks's (2010) Claim that "Voodoo" is a "Progress-Resistant" Cultural Influence (Article)
Title: The Scapegoating of Haitian Vodou Religion: David Brooks's (2010) Claim that "Voodoo" is a "Progress-Resistant" Cultural Influence
Author: Benjamin Hebblethwaite
Abstract: Shortly after the catastrophic earthquake that crushed Port-au-Prince and the surrounding towns on January 12, 2010, The New York Times published an article in which columnist David Brooks claimed that “voodoo” is a “progress-resistant” cultural influence because it spreads the message that “life is capricious and planning futile.” Alongside Brooks, many authors promote similar views, especially Christians. I argue that Vodou does not negatively affect progress in Haiti. Rather, there are historical, linguistic, and governmental policies that limit progress. In reality, Vodou practitioners enhance progress in their attention to the planning and giving of ceremonies, in the hierarchical organization they establish in communities, in their ritual and language, and in the education imparted through inheritance, teaching, and initiation. The scapegoating of Vodou by Brooks and others perpetuates a racist colonial legacy, and it betrays an ignorance of the community and the abundant research about it.
Year: 2014
Primary URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0021934714555186
Primary URL Description: Journal website
Access Model: Article in a journal, print and online
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal of Black Studies
Publisher: Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing

Trees in Vodou: An Arbori-Cultural Exploration (Article)
Title: Trees in Vodou: An Arbori-Cultural Exploration
Author: Andrew Tarter
Abstract: Trees are an important dwelling place for the spirits of the Vodou pantheon. I describe arboreal rituals dedicated to the veneration of tree-residing spirits, taboos against cutting sacred trees, conflicting taboos against planting certain trees, and a ceremony for removing a spirit from one tree and placing it in another. After discussing common folk beliefs about particular tree species, and examining associations between these species and individual spirits, I suggest that a rapid decrease of trees in Haiti mandated the ceremony for removing a spirit from a tree and placing it somewhere else. Consequently, as tree diversity dwindled into the handful of primary species utilized in rural Haiti today, a large pantheon of spirits had to be funneled into an increasingly limited number of trees. Accordingly, Vodou practitioners had to facilitate spirit flexibility with regard to which trees they inhabit.
Year: 2015
Primary URL: https://journals.equinoxpub.com/index.php/JSRNC/article/view/19582
Primary URL Description: Publisher's website
Access Model: Journal article
Format: Journal
Periodical Title: Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture
Publisher: Sheffield, UK: Equinox Publishing LTD


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