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Products for grant TR-259293-18

TR-259293-18
Classroom Connections
Kevin McFadden, University of Virginia

Grant details: https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=TR-259293-18

“To Be A Citizen? The History of Becoming American.” (Web Resources)
Title: “To Be A Citizen? The History of Becoming American.”
Author: Charlie Shelton-Ormond
Abstract: Around three quarters of a million people applied to be American Citizens in 2017. But what does citizenship actually mean? The way Americans have defined citizenship has changed over time and many have found their citizenship challenged, undermined, resisted and even revoked. On this episode of BackStory, Brian, Nathan and Joanne discover the path to citizenship has never been easy.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/to-be-a-citizen/
Primary URL Description: Backstory podcast: “To Be A Citizen? The History of Becoming American.”

“Divided States of America? The History of An Often Disjointed Union.” (Web Resources)
Title: “Divided States of America? The History of An Often Disjointed Union.”
Author: Matt Darroch
Abstract: Google the phrase “divided America” and you’ll find numerous, stories, opinion pieces and even psychological theories on why we’re so disconnected. From race and class to gender and politics, it seems that Americans can’t see eye-to-eye – to the point that a recent NBC News headline stated, “Americans are divided over everything except division.” On this episode, Ed, Nathan and Joanne look at other times in history when Americans were split.
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/divided-states-of-america/
Primary URL Description: Backstory podcast: “Divided States of America? The History of An Often Disjointed Union.”

"To Be a Citizen?" Backstory podcast Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "To Be a Citizen?" Backstory podcast Lesson Set
Author: Michael Gurlea
Abstract: Classroom resource guide to accompany BackStory Classroom Connections podcast "To Be a Citizen?"
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2019/01/CC1-Citizenship.pdf

"Divided States of America?" Backstory podcast lesson set (Web Resources)
Title: "Divided States of America?" Backstory podcast lesson set
Author: Michael Gurlea
Abstract: Classroom connections lesson set to accompany "Divided States of America?" episode
Year: 2018
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2019/01/CC2-Divided-America.pdf

"To Be a Citizen?" Backstory classroom resource video (Web Resources)
Title: "To Be a Citizen?" Backstory classroom resource video
Author: Backstory
Abstract: This video accompanies BackStory episode “To be a Citizen? The History of Becoming American,” the first episode in the Classroom Connections series. "To be a Citizen?" explores how different Americans have defined “citizenship” through the centuries. The episode and related resources are funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities This video uses the chunking method to reinforce key ideas and concepts. A companion lesson set is also available.
Year: 2018

"Man vs. the Machine: Technophobia and American Society" (Web Resources)
Title: "Man vs. the Machine: Technophobia and American Society"
Author: Adam Shapiro
Abstract: What drives people to reject technology? Though American society has been driven by technological leaps forward, not everyone has come along for the ride. We explore the strain of technophobia in American society from Neo-Luddism to Sabbatarianism and the anti-technology terrorism of the Unabomber.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/man-vs-the-machine/
Primary URL Description: BackStory podcast: "Man vs. the Machine: Technophobia and American Society"

"Man vs. the Machine" Backstory Podcast Lesson Set (Course or Curricular Materials)
Title: "Man vs. the Machine" Backstory Podcast Lesson Set
Author: Backstory staff
Abstract: This lesson set uses the Inquiry Design Model (IDM), a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers’ knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for State Social Studies Standards (2013). Unique to the IDM is the blueprint, a one-page representation of the questions, tasks, and sources that define a curricular inquiry. This lesson asks the compelling question How do people react to rapid technological economic change? and instructs students to write, using specific historical evidence, a response to the following questions: How did American’s respond to the rapid changes of the Market Revolution? What changed and what stayed the same? In addition to the C3 Framework, it uses both AP US Thematic Standards and AP US Content Standards.
Year: 2019
Audience: K - 12

"Burnt Corks & Cake Walks: The Toxic Legacy of Blackface in American History" (Web Resources)
Title: "Burnt Corks & Cake Walks: The Toxic Legacy of Blackface in American History"
Author: Charlie Shelton-Ormond
Abstract: Ed, Nathan and Brian explore the history of blackface, from its heyday as the most popular form of entertainment in America to its afterlife in the controversial images that appear in college yearbooks. What explains the long life of blackface in American culture?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/burnt-corks-cakewalks/
Primary URL Description: "Burnt Corks & Cake Walks" Backstory podcast

"Red in the Stars & Stripes: A History of Socialism in America" (Web Resources)
Title: "Red in the Stars & Stripes: A History of Socialism in America"
Author: Matt Darroch
Abstract: More candidates for political office in America today identify themselves as socialists than ever before. But isn’t the idea of socialism anathema to American values of free enterprise and entrepreneurism? BackStory reveals the rich history of socialism in the USA.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/red-in-the-stars-and-stripes/
Primary URL Description: "Red in the Stars & Stripes" Backstory podcast

"Paying for the Past: Reparations and American History" (Web Resources)
Title: "Paying for the Past: Reparations and American History"
Author: Charlie Shelton-Ormond
Abstract: Reparations for African-Americans has been a hot topic on the presidential campaign trail, with Democratic candidates including Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren coming out in favor of compensation for unpaid African-American labor. But the debate around reparations is nothing new. In fact, it goes back centuries. On this episode, Nathan, Ed and Brian explore the complicated – and often contentious – history of reparations, from the first mass reparations movement led by Callie House, an ex-slave, to a unique moment when African-Americans in Florida received compensation for the destruction of their community.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/reparations/
Primary URL Description: "Paying for the Past" Backstory podcast

"A History of Stonewall, the Riot That Started The LGBTQ Revolution” (Web Resources)
Title: "A History of Stonewall, the Riot That Started The LGBTQ Revolution”
Author: David Stenhouse
Abstract: In the early hours of June 28, 1969, a riot broke out at a rundown gay bar in New York City. Today the Stonewall uprising is famous around the world as a clash that helped spark a gay political revolution. Brian and Nathan talk to scholars and participants and discover how Stonewall led to a wave of activism, protest and political agitation.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/a-history-of-stonewall-the-riot-that-started-the-lgbtq-revolution/
Primary URL Description: "A History of Stonewall" Backstory podcast

"Moon, Man, and Myths: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11” (Web Resources)
Title: "Moon, Man, and Myths: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11”
Author: Matt Darroch
Abstract: In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, BackStory launches into the history of America’s race to the moon. We’ll hear from flight director Gene Kranz about what it was like in Mission Control during the moon landing. And we’ll explore a kind of Apollo nostalgia that has crept into movies and other forms of pop culture. Plus, stay tuned throughout the episode to hear from our listeners about their memories of the moon landing.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/moon-man-myths/
Primary URL Description: "Moon, Man, and Myths" Backstory podcast

"1619: The Arrival of the First Africans" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "1619: The Arrival of the First Africans" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: In 1619, the first Africans were brought against their will across the Atlantic Ocean to the Virginia colony. It marked the beginning of the institution of slavery in the Unites States. Over 400 years later, the United States is still grappling with the legacy of slavery and systemic racism. Generations of African Americans have been subject to untold cruelty. However, it is also true that much of America’s current prosperity can be traced back to the contributions of slaves. This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, provide a retrospective of the origins of the African slave trade in the U.S. The episode raises difficult questions about how we should commemorate the 400-year anniversary of this dark moment in American history. Using modern perspectives, students will form arguments on how to best approach the legacy of slavery in the United States.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/05/1619-The-Arrival-of-the-First-Africans-in-Virginia-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "1619: The Arrival of the First Africans" Lesson Set

"1619: The Arrival of the First Africans" (Web Resources)
Title: "1619: The Arrival of the First Africans"
Author: Melissa Gismondi
Abstract: This month marks the 400th anniversary of the first Africans’ arrival at what would become British North America. It wasn’t the first time Africans set foot in what became the United States – they’d arrived some 100 years earlier with Spanish colonists. But 1619 looms large in American history because it marks the beginning of slavery’s development in the Virginia colony and later the entire nation.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/1619-the-arrival-of-the-first-africans-in-virginia/
Primary URL Description: "1619: The Arrival of the First Africans" podcast

"Darkness over the Plain: Bison in American History" (Web Resources)
Title: "Darkness over the Plain: Bison in American History"
Author: Matt Darroch
Abstract: According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature, there are over 28,000 threatened species in the world. But this is hardly the first time our planet has faced the prospect of mass extinction. In the beginning of the 20th century, America’s flora and fauna were seriously threatened by urban encroachment and over-hunting. And one animal at the center of this struggle was the bison. So in celebration of World Animal Day, Brian and Nathan explore the history of bison in America. We’ll find out how the bison went from an animal in excess to near extinction and we’ll learn how Madison Grant’s work preserving the bison went hand and hand with his theories on eugenics. Plus, we’ll hear from the Buffalo Representative of the Eastern Shoshone about his efforts to restore the buffalo.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/darkness-over-the-plain/
Primary URL Description: "Darkness over the Plain: Bison in American History" podcast

"Darkness over the Plain: A History of Bison in America" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Darkness over the Plain: A History of Bison in America" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: Atthebeginningofthe19th century,millionsofAmericanbisonfreelyroamedtheplains. They were an important and sacred part of the lives of Native American tribes. However, in the years following the Civil War, westward expansion from frontiersmen resulted in the rapid decline of the bison population. The expanding railroad system gave settlers unprecedented access to hunting and transporting bison herds. The United States government saw a strategic benefit in allowing overhunting, knowing that it would upend society for Native Americans. As a result, bison were nearly hunted into extinction by the end of the century. This lesson and corresponding BackStory episode explore the reasons for the decimation ofthebisonpopulationduringthe19th century.Italsooutlineshistoricalandcontemporary efforts to conserve and protect this species. Bison are often used as a positive symbol of the American Great Plains. However, as this lesson examines, the destruction of the bison population also represents darker undercurrents of United States history such as colonization and Manifest Destiny.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/Darkness-Over-the-Plain-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Darkness over the Plain: A History of Bison in America" Lesson Set

"How Reconstruction Transformed the Constitution: A Feature Conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian Eric Foner" (Web Resources)
Title: "How Reconstruction Transformed the Constitution: A Feature Conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian Eric Foner"
Author: Melissa Gismondi
Abstract: If you turn on the news, you’re likely to find a heated debate about big issues, from citizenship to voting rights. For Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner, these issues are at the heart of what are often called the “Reconstruction Amendments”: the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the US Constitution. They were passed in 1865, 1868 and 1870, respectively. And if you ask Eric, they’ve been misinterpreted and overlooked for generations. On this episode, Ed sits down with Eric Foner, a professor emeritus of history at Columbia University, to talk about public perceptions of Reconstruction, the landmark amendments to the Constitution and how they have the power to change the country today. Foner’s new book is The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/how-reconstruction-transformed-the-constitution/
Primary URL Description: "How Reconstruction Transformed the Constitution: A Feature Conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian Eric Foner"

"How Reconstruction Transformed the Constitution: A Conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian Eric Foner" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "How Reconstruction Transformed the Constitution: A Conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian Eric Foner" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: In the years following the Civil War, the United States government faced the difficult challenges of needing to heal the country while providing rights and opportunities to African Americans.The passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution provided unprecedented rights for African Americans. However, these rights were not always realized because of coordinated efforts in the American south to undermine federal law with state laws and regulations that maintained segregation and disenfranchisement. Though federal law had changed, these “Jim Crow” laws prevented African Americans from achieving true equality. For this reason, many historians have categorized the Reconstruction era as a “failure.” This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, focus on the legacy of the Reconstruction era. The episode provides an interview with historian Eric Foner. He argues that Reconstruction should be thought of as an “unfinished revolution” rather than a historical failure. In fact, he believes that the United States is still grappling with the fallout of the Reconstruction Amendments in today’s political landscape. The goal of this lesson is to provide a critical lens for viewing both the positive and negative elements of Reconstruction.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/How-Reconstruction-Transformed-the-Constitution-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "How Reconstruction Transformed the Constitution: A Conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian Eric Foner" Lesson Set

"Rallying Behind Racism: The Women of White Supremacy" (Web Resources)
Title: "Rallying Behind Racism: The Women of White Supremacy"
Author: Melissa Gismondi
Abstract: White supremacy has been in the news a lot recently. It is often seen as a movement at the fringes of American society, and discussion of it rarely includes white women. But women play a critical, if overlooked, role in the white supremacy movement, and examining their involvement shows it to be far less fringe than many think. So on this episode of BackStory, Brian, Nathan and Joanne dig into the little known history of white women and white supremacy.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/rallying-behind-racism/
Primary URL Description: "Rallying Behind Racism: The Women of White Supremacy" podcast

"Rallying Behind Racism: The Women of White Supremacy" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Rallying Behind Racism: The Women of White Supremacy" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: In the wake of the 2017 “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, there has been an increased awareness of white supremacy in the national discourse. However, white supremacy movements have existed in the United States since the founding of the country. Following the abolition of slavery, white supremacy groups fought for continued segregation with Jim Crow laws. Historians have often focused on the role of men in shaping the national narrative of white supremacy. However, this lens ignores the contributions of white women throughout history who fought to maintain racial hierarchies. This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, focus on the women of different white supremacy movements throughout American history. Far from being innocent bystanders, women frequently took an active role in trying to preserve the status quo of racial inequality. The episode discusses white supremacy in three different contexts: slavery during the 19th century, during Jim Crow-era segregation, and today. Because of the sensitive nature of the subject matter, some elements of this lesson plan may be difficult for some students to hear and discuss.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/The-Women-of-White-Supremacy-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Rallying Behind Racism: The Women of White Supremacy" Lesson Set

"Sunny Days: The History of Sesame Street in America and the World" (Web Resources)
Title: "Sunny Days: The History of Sesame Street in America and the World"
Author: Matt Darroch
Abstract: This month marks the 50th anniversary of Sesame Street, the children’s television show that has made an indelible mark on American culture, not to mention people all over the world. So on this episode of BackStory, Brian, Ed and Joanne explore the history of Sesame Street and what made a show about muppets and their neighbors so revolutionary.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/sunny-days/
Primary URL Description: "Sunny Days: The History of Sesame Street in America and the World" podcast

"Sunny Days: The History of Sesame Street in America and the World" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Sunny Days: The History of Sesame Street in America and the World" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: In November 2019, Sesame Street celebrated its 50th anniversary of being on television. The original concept of the show was simple: using television to teach young children. Specifically, the show’s creators wanted to help young, disadvantaged children who were at risk of struggling in school. Sesame Street has evolved over these fifty years, but the show’s core objective remains the same. Though income inequality has remained a significant problem in the United States, Sesame Street remains steadfast in providing equal educational opportunities for children. As the audience for Sesame Street has grown, the show has used its characters to embody the values of multiculturalism and diversity. The show has incorporated characters with autism, HIV, and physical disabilities to provide children with relatable examples of people different from themselves. They have also embraced different cultures, languages, races, and ethnicities, giving children opportunities to see themselves in the lives of puppets. As a result, Sesame Street has become a global phenomenon with variations of the show existing in countries across the world. This lesson focuses on the history of Sesame Street and its value in promoting diversity and multiculturalism. Using a segment about Rosita, a longstanding bilingual character, students will examine how the show explores issues of identity and diversity.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/The-History-of-Sesame-Street-in-America-and-the-World-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Sunny Days: The History of Sesame Street in America and the World" Lesson Set

"From Backstory to You: A History of Giving and Receiving" (Web Resources)
Title: "From Backstory to You: A History of Giving and Receiving"
Author: Melissa Gismondi
Author: Charlie Shelton-Ormond
Abstract: ‘Tis the season for giving. Whether it’s the latest gadget or the coziest sweater, many Americans are spending the month of December searching for that perfect gift. But throughout American history, gift giving has taken on many different forms. And the act of giving and receiving has allowed bonds to form across social, political, and cultural divides. On this episode of BackStory, Brian, Joanne and Nathan bring you two very different stories of giving and receiving. One starts in Ireland, and the other looks at a time when lending a helping hand resulted in more harm than good.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/from-backstory-to-you/
Primary URL Description: "From Backstory to You: A History of Giving and Receiving" podcast

"From Backstory to You: A History of Giving and Receiving" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "From Backstory to You: A History of Giving and Receiving" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: This BackStory episode focuses on two different examples of giving in American history. One story chronicles the generous giving of money by Native Americans to people in Ireland suffering from the Great Famine of 1845. The other story discusses the underappreciated contributions of African Americans in providing relief to the people of Philadelphia during an outbreak of yellow fever in the 1790s. In both stories, the gifts represent a connection between people of different backgrounds, cultures, and races. As you go through the lesson, ask students to focus on how these gifts were given and received. What can we learn from gift-giving throughout U.S. history?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/From-BackStory-to-You-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "From Backstory to You: A History of Giving and Receiving" Lesson Set

"Those Were the Days: Nostalgia in American History" (Web Resources)
Title: "Those Were the Days: Nostalgia in American History"
Author: Charlie Shelton-Ormond
Abstract: It’s common for folks to look back on a time gone by and romanticize it as “better days.” But is nostalgia a harmless yearning for the past, or a distraction from what’s happening in the present?
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/those-were-the-days/
Primary URL Description: "Those Were the Days: Nostalgia in American History"

"Those Were the Days: Nostalgia in American History" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Those Were the Days: Nostalgia in American History" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: Nostalgia is a sentimental longing for something from the past. It is a universal feeling that exists in different ways in our popular culture and politics. Just as the television show “I Love The 90s” appealed to a population of millennials, Donald Trump’s campaign slogan of “Make America Great Again” harkens back to a bygone era of American history. This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, examine different examples of nostalgia throughout American history, including music, television, architecture, and politics. With each example of nostalgia presented, students should be encouraged to consider why it gained traction among a certain population of Americans. Additionally, students need to consider whether the idealized version of America conflicts with the experience of different minority groups.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/Nostalgia-in-American-History-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Those Were the Days: Nostalgia in American History" Lesson Set

"Seminoles, Retirees, and Florida Man: A Brief History of the Sunshine State" (Web Resources)
Title: "Seminoles, Retirees, and Florida Man: A Brief History of the Sunshine State"
Author: Matt Darroch
Abstract: As most of America is bundled up in the dead of winter – we’re wearing our flip-flops, slathering on sunscreen, and basking in the history of the Sunshine State. On this episode of BackStory, Joanne, Nathan and Brian learn about the social media phenomenon called “Florida Man,” explore the often overlooked story of the Seminoles, discover how the state became a mecca for retirees, and find out about the remarkable efforts of one woman to preserve Florida’s natural environment.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/seminoles-retirees-and-florida-man/
Primary URL Description: "Seminoles, Retirees, and Florida Man: A Brief History of the Sunshine State" podcast

"Seminoles, Retirees, and Florida Man: A Brief History of the Sunshine State" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Seminoles, Retirees, and Florida Man: A Brief History of the Sunshine State" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: As most of America is bundled up in the dead of winter – we’re wearing our flip-flops, slathering on sunscreen, and basking in the history of the Sunshine State. On this episode of BackStory, Joanne, Nathan and Brian learn about the social media phenomenon called “Florida Man,” explore the often overlooked story of the Seminoles, discover how the state became a mecca for retirees, and find out about the remarkable efforts of one woman to preserve Florida’s natural environment.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/seminoles-retirees-and-florida-man/#resources
Primary URL Description: "Seminoles, Retirees, and Florida Man: A Brief History of the Sunshine State" Lesson Set

"From Music to Madiba: The History of US Relations with South Africa" (Web Resources)
Title: "From Music to Madiba: The History of US Relations with South Africa"
Author: Melissa Gismondi
Abstract: Thirty years ago this week, Nelson Mandela, the renowned civil rights and anti-apartheid leader, was released from prison. His release marked the beginning of the end of South Africa’s brutal apartheid regime and a new future for black South Africans. So on this episode of BackStory, Joanne, Ed and Brian take a look at the complicated and often contentious relationship American officials and anti-racism activists have had with South Africa.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/shows/us-south-africa/

"From Music to Madiba: The History of US Relations with South Africa" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "From Music to Madiba: The History of US Relations with South Africa" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: From 1948 to the early 1990s, South Africa used an institutional policy of segregation known as apartheid to marginalize the nonwhite population. Though whites were a minority group in South Africa, apartheid allowed them to exert control over the government, economy, and society. Apartheid faced opposition from the global community including the United Nations especially in the 1970s and 1980s. Social movements within South Africa intensified during this time as well, even as prominent black leaders like Nelson Mandela were imprisoned. The United States government shifted its stance on South Africa throughout the 20th century. During much of the Cold War, the U.S. prioritized maintaining friendly alliances with anticommunist regimes over the fight for global equality. In competing with the Soviet Union, the U.S. also relied upon valuable minerals exported by the segregationist South African government. There were clear racial elements to U.S. policy as well, as many politicians were in favor of a continuation of domestic Jim Crow era laws promoting a segregated society. This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, focus on the evolving history of relations between the U.S. and South Africa. Though the U.S. and South Africa have different histories, they shared racial and political upheaval throughout the 20th century. Examining the U.S. response to South Africa allows students to explore the complicated issues that shaped foreign policy during the Cold War era.
Year: 2020
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/05/From-Music-to-Madiba-A-History-of-U.S.-Relations-with-South-Africa-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "From Music to Madiba: The History of US Relations with South Africa" Lesson Set

"Burnt Corks and Cake Walks: The Toxic Legacy of Blackface in American History" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Burnt Corks and Cake Walks: The Toxic Legacy of Blackface in American History" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: In early 2019, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam was embroiled in a political scandal regarding his use of blackface in a 1984 yearbook photograph. The photograph, from his time at Eastern Virginia Medical School, showed a person wearing blackface standing next to another person wearing a Ku Klux Klan uniform. The ensuing fallout from this revelation brought blackface and its presence throughout US history back to the forefront of American discourse. This lesson focuses on the enduring history of blackface in American culture. It emerged as a byproduct of minstrel shows following the American Civil War. Used as a form of mockery and vehicle for promoting racial stereotypes, minstrelsy was one of the most popular forms of entertainmentinthelate19th century. Thisunfortunatelegacycontinuedintothe20th century.Thoughtherearecountless examples of blackface used in various forms of entertainment, the Backstory episode highlights the legacy of blackface in the Mummers Parade. This Philadelphia New Year’s Day tradition is one of the oldest folk festivals in the United States. It also has a history of explicit racial overtones and blackface. This legacy was challenged during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, leading to a conflict between African American groups and event participants. Though blackface was officially outlawed from the event in 1964, examples of racism, sexism, and bigotry have endured. Though the history of the Mummers Parade has an undeniable connection to blackface and racial stereotypes, thousands of people look forward to watching and participating in this annual tradition. Many of these participants have no knowledge of the history of the event. This lesson forces students to confront questions about the racist underpinnings of American culture. Can respected traditions of American culture be separated from their racist undertones? How does the legacy of blackface still permeate American society?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/05/Burnt-Corks-and-Cakewalks-The-Toxic-History-of-Blackface-in-American-History-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Burnt Corks and Cake Walks: The Toxic Legacy of Blackface in American History" Lesson Set

"Red in the Stars & Stripes: A History of Socialism in America" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Red in the Stars & Stripes: A History of Socialism in America" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: At many times throughout American history, there have been organized movements in favor of socialism. This debate continues in today’s politics, as several candidates in the Democratic Party have advocated for a more socialist approach to the United States economy. For some Americans, socialism represents a more equitable distribution of power and wealth. For others, its values are completely antithetical to the “American Dream” and free enterprise. This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, focus on how the United States has grappled with socialism throughout its history. It covers the rise of labor movements in the late 19th andearly20th centuries,includingthePullmanStrikeandthecontributionsofEugeneV. Debs. It outlines the unique politics of Milwaukee, Wisconsin which elected three socialist mayors between 1910 and 1960. It discusses conservative critiques of socialism put forward by media figures such as Clarence Manion that still resonate in political discourse today. Finally, it examines the perspective of the current mayor of Jackson, Mississippi who is a self-identified socialist. For many people, there is a negative connotation to the term “socialism.” This lesson explores some of the reasons behind this stigma. The goal is to get students to use a critical lens when examining the ongoing confrontation between socialism and capitalism throughout American history.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/A-History-of-Socialism-in-America-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Red in the Stars & Stripes: A History of Socialism in America" Lesson Set

"Paying for the Past: Reparations and American History" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Paying for the Past: Reparations and American History" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: Though the American Civil War concluded over 150 years ago, its effects still resonate in the social, economic, and political lives of millions of Americans. At the conclusion of the war, the federal government made efforts to rebuild the lives of former slaves. Though many of these “Reconstruction Era” efforts were well-meaning, they faced stiff opposition from former slave owners and politicians who did not want to enfranchise African Americans. As a result, many freed slaves faced generational socioeconomic hurdles preventing upward mobility. 21st centurypoliticiansandeconomistsarestillgrapplingwithhowtobestaddress significant disparities in wealth and racial equality. One frequently discussed idea is the payment of reparations to descendants of former slaves. The goal is to properly fulfill the failed promise of Reconstruction Era policies and fight against systemic and historical barriers to advancement. However, these policies come in many different forms and are contentious for many Americans. This lesson focuses on different aspects of reparations throughout American history. The goal is to force students to confront questions about how to best address ongoing disparities of race, wealth, and justice. How has the United States tried to address these questions in the past? Why has reparations endured as controversial issue in American politics today?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/A-History-of-Socialism-in-America-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Paying for the Past: Reparations and American History" Lesson Set

"A History of Stonewall, the Riot that Started the LGBTQ Revolution" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "A History of Stonewall, the Riot that Started the LGBTQ Revolution" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: In the early morning hours of June 28th, 1969, police officers raided The Stonewall Inn, a well-known gay bar in New York City. These types of raids occurred regularly and without incident at other gay bars and nightclubs in the city. However, on this night, patrons of the bar stayed outside and protested the police interference into their lives. Though this moment was not well-covered by the national media, it became a turning point in the fight for equal rights in the gay community. Many historians credit this demonstration as the spark that launched many different LGBTQ groups to form and start a more coordinated movement for equality. It also represents another challenge to the social and political status quo of the 1960s. This lesson, and the corresponding BackStory episode, focus the legacy of the uprising at Stonewall Inn. Because of the personal nature of many of the accounts presented, encourage students to focus on the events from a historical lens.
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/05/A-History-of-Stonewall-The-Riot-That-Started-the-LGBTQ-Revolution-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "A History of Stonewall, the Riot that Started the LGBTQ Revolution" Lesson Set

"Moon, Man, and Myths: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11" Lesson Set (Web Resources)
Title: "Moon, Man, and Myths: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11" Lesson Set
Author: Diana Williams
Abstract: On July 20, 1969, the United States celebrated an amazing scientific achievement: landing the Apollo 11 on the surface of the moon. As Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first two men to walk on the lunar surface, the American public watched with nationalistic pride. This singular moment was the culmination of a decade of extensive efforts by the U.S. government and the scientific community. It also served as a public declaration of international supremacy during the Cold War between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. This lesson reflects on the legacy of the “space race” during the 1960s. Fifty years after the fact, the moon landing is still celebrated as one of the greatest achievements in human history. However, this era is also often treated with an uncritical nostalgia. For many Americans, the Apollo 11 mission represents a moment of unity at a calamitous time in American history. For other Americans, the “space race” was a distraction from the fight for civil rights and the intractable conflict in Vietnam. As you go through the lesson, encourage students to think critically about these contradictions. Why does the Apollo 11 mission remain the subject of American nostalgia after fifty years? What role did the space race play in advancing social, economic, and geopolitical interests? How should we reflect on this time period as students of history?
Year: 2019
Primary URL: https://www.backstoryradio.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/13/2020/03/The-50th-Anniversary-of-Apollo-11-Lesson-Set.pdf
Primary URL Description: "Moon, Man, and Myths: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11" Lesson Set


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